poplar

(redirected from Poplars)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

poplar,

n Latin names:
Populus alba, Populus termuloides, Populus nigra; part used: bark; uses: arthritis, diarrhea, urinary infections, colds, gastrointestinal complaints; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children younger than twelve, asthma, coagulation disorders, anticoagulant disorders, salicylate sensitivity, nasal polyps, hepatoxicity. Also called
American aspen, black poplar, quaking aspen, or
white poplar.
Enlarge picture
Pomegranate.
References in classic literature ?
So he hid it under the boughs of the sleeping poplar tree.
Mercury asked all the trees if they had seen the pot of gold, and the elm, oak and pine pointed to the poplar and said,
And then she told us the old legend that the cross on which the Saviour of the world suffered was made of aspen poplar wood and so never again could its poor, shaken, shivering leaves know rest or peace.
The trees had not been cut or trimmed, each one preserved the magnificent palm-branch shape that makes the Lombard poplar one of the grandest of trees; there they stood, a natural monument which a man might well be proud of having reared.
Do you not notice the sweet scent given off by the gum of the poplar buds, and the resin of the larches?
It is something of all these things," the doctor answered, as he dismounted and fastened his horse to a branch of a poplar tree.
It was dusk turning to dark by the time they reached the remote green by the poplars and accepted the new and aimless game of shooting at the old mark.
The last light seemed to fade from the lawn, and the poplars against the sunset were like great plumes upon a purple hearse, when the futile procession finally curved round,and came out in front of the target.
At the further side the road winds through La Reolle, Bazaille, and Marmande, with the sunlit river still gleaming upon the right, and the bare poplars bristling up upon either side.
She's as straight as a poplar," mumbled old Mazey to himself, hobbling along after his youthful companion, and wagging his venerable head in cordial approval.
When, on fine autumn mornings, he found the countess sitting peacefully on a bench, beneath a poplar now yellowing, the poor lover would sit at her feet, looking into her eyes as long as she would let him, hoping ever that the light that was in them would become intelligent.
She also gave him a sharp adze, and then led the way to the far end of the island where the largest trees grew--alder, poplar and pine, that reached the sky--very dry and well seasoned, so as to sail light for him in the water.