poor sleep hygiene

poor sleep hygiene

A general term for pre-sleep habits that are suboptimal and not conducive to proper rest, which can affect a person’s functioning during the day.

Aetiology
Excess alcohol, tobacco, meals or snacks immediately before sleep; sedentary lifestyle; daytime napping; bereavement; traumatic events and personal tragedies.

Management
Regular exercise, abstinence from abuse substances, stress reduction, meditation, autohypnosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Poor sleep hygiene disrupts both short and long-term health, according to evidence from numerous studies.
This underlying issue, along with poor sleep hygiene, challenges my patients in getting the seven hours recommended by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.
Poor sleep hygiene is a set of behaviors that influence sleep quality (ie, watching television [TV], uncomfortable nighttime ambient temperature, and exciting pre-sleep activities).
The combination of poor sleep hygiene, too much exposure to blue light, poor diet, and lack of activity at the right time of day throws our whole circadian system out of balance, resulting in increased vulnerability to a host of maladies from cancer to heart disease to depression.
Poor sleep hygiene was found to increase sleep latency (the amount of time it takes to fall asleep), so if you are caring for a family member with dementia, take steps to address sleep habits that might contribute to your poor sleep (such as daytime naps, insufficient physical activity, and watching television before bed).
Scientists say this kind of "poor sleep hygiene" and changes to your body clockcan result in ill-health, putting us at risk of severe depression and other mood disorders.
Poor sleep hygiene was found to increase sleep latency, or the amount of time it takes to fall asleep.
Using mobile phones late at night or waking in the early hours to make a cup of tea were among the bad habits that contribute to "poor sleep hygiene", Daniel Smith, senior author of the paper, told The Times.
Other causes of sleep impairments in postmenopausal women that may contribute to significant sleep disruption include poor sleep hygiene (i.e.
Many things can cause insomnia, including unseen illness, medication side effects, alcohol or drug use, chronic pain, restless legs syndrome, sleep apnea, too much caffeine, migraines, and poor sleep hygiene. If you really can't sleep chronically, see a doctor.
Poor sleep hygiene may contribute to the development of sleep disturbances among people with MS.