pontic

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Related to Pontics: False tooth

denture

 [den´cher]
a complement of teeth, either natural or artificial; ordinarily used to designate an artificial replacement for the natural teeth and adjacent tissues.
complete denture an appliance replacing all the teeth of one jaw, as well as associated structures of the jaw.
fixed partial denture a partial denture held in position by attachments to adjacent prepared natural teeth, roots, or implants; called also bridge.
implant denture an artificial denture or single tooth retained and stabilized by a framework or post implanted in the bone.
A subperiosteal implant. From Darby and Walsh, 1995.
overlay denture a complete denture supported both by soft tissue (mucosa) and by a few remaining natural teeth that have been altered, as by insertion of a long or short coping, to permit the denture to fit over them.
partial denture a dental appliance that replaces one or more missing teeth, receiving support and retention from underlying tissues and some or all of the remaining teeth; it may be either permanently attached or removable. See fixed partial denture and removable partial denture.
removable partial denture a partial denture made so that it can readily be removed from the mouth.

pon·tic

(pon'tik),
An artificial tooth on a fixed partial denture; it replaces the lost natural tooth, restores its functions, and usually occupies the space previously occupied by the natural crown.
Synonym(s): dummy (1)

pontic

/pon·tic/ (pon´tik) the portion of a dental bridge that substitutes for an absent tooth.

pontic

[pon′tik]
Etymology: L, pons, bridge
the suspended member of a removable partial denture or fixed bridge, such as an artificial tooth, usually occupying the space previously occupied by the natural tooth crown.

pon·tic

(pon'tik)
An artificial tooth on a fixed or removable partial denture; it replaces the lost natural tooth and restores its functions, and usually occupies the space previously occupied by the natural crown.

Pontic

An artificial tooth.

pon·tic

(pon'tik)
Artificial tooth on a fixed partial denture; replaces lost natural tooth, restores its functions, and usually occupies space previously occupied by natural crown.

pontic (pon´tik),

n the suspended member of a fixed partial denture; an artificial tooth on a fixed partial denture or an isolated tooth on a removable partial denture. It replaces a lost natural tooth, restores its function, and usually occupies the space previously occupied by the natural crown. See also abutment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pontic preserves a number of archaic features, typical of earlier stages in the history of Greek, retains a number of shared features with the rest of Greek varieties of Asia Minor and exhibits contact-induced features from Turkish, which has affected Pontic both on the vocabulary and the structural level.
In Pontic, loan nouns are almost exclusively accommodated as masculine in -is or -as in the citation form (rarely in -es) that is, as nouns inflected according to IC2 (7a), and, despite some rare exceptions (e.
As far as Pontic is concerned, Turkish loans are assigned a grammatical gender, as opposed to Turkish which is genderless, at least grammatically.
Phonology is also important for male loans ending in Turkish in a consonant (9a), but only in conjunction with a native Pontic phonological rule which deletes final unstressed /i/s.
Comparing now the inflection of masculine loans in Pontic to the native one in effect, we observe an indubitable preference for IC2, that is, for the inflection class of masculine nouns in -as/-is in the citation form, as opposed to the inflection of native nouns where IC1 (i.
Pontic kolayuzi-s 'driver' < Tr kilavuz 'guide' vs.
Ridge contouring for modified pontic design was done with help of Lasers in 12, 11 and 21 region (fig.
Zitzmann and colleagues' study on premolars and molars noted that an edentulous space with an ovate pontic supported by adequate oral hygiene was not associated with overt clinical signs of inflammation.
Edmund Cavazos, demonstrated that the adaptation of a pontic to the ridge or the amount of "relief" (scraping of the cast) provided in the cast is highly significant and directly proportionate to the amount of unfavorable tissue change.
CONCLUSION: The modified ovate pontic has less soft tissue contacting surface and less curvature than the ovate pontic.
Use of modified ovate pontic in areas of ridge defects: A report of two cases.
The ovate pontic design: A histologic observation in humans.