Pontiac fever


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Pontiac fever

 [pon´te-ak]
an influenzalike illness with little or no pulmonary involvement, caused by Legionella pneumophila and first observed in Pontiac, Michigan. It is not life-threatening as is the pulmonary form known as legionnaires' disease. The syndrome appears within 2 to 3 hours of contact with an infected person and lasts 2 to 5 days. There is complete recovery without residual effects, with or without antimicrobial therapy.
An epidemic infection by a gram-negative bacterium Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6—and other Legionella spp—which generally runs its course without causing pneumonia, first described in Pontiac, Michigan, in 1968
Management Pontiac fever is a self-limited condition for which supportive care suffices and antibiotics are useless

Pontiac fever

Pontiac disease A epidemic infection by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6–and other Legionella spp, without pneumonia, described in Pontiac, Michigan in 1968 Clinical 24-48 hr incubation, fever, headaches, myalgia, cough, ±diarrhea, neurologic signs; resolution in 1 wk. Cf Legionnaire's disease.

Pontiac fever

A disease associated with organisms of the Legionella genus and characterized by sudden fever, headache, painful muscles and debility. It does not, however, like LEGIONNAIRES' DISEASE, progress to pneumonia nor is it contagious.

Pontiac,

city in Michigan, where an outbreak of Legionella occurred in 1968.
Pontiac fever - a strain of Legionella pneumophila.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the 271 reported cases included in the study, 195 were classified as Legionnaires' disease (72 confirmed and 123 presumptive) and 76 as Pontiac fever (9 confirmed and 67 presumptive) (Table 1).
In this instance, Pontiac fever was the clinical presentation.
Pontiac fever due to aerosolized antigens of Legionella pneumophila is another risk of whirlpool use [30,31].
(1985), "An Outbreak of Pontiac Fever Related to Whirlpool Use, Michigan 1982," JAMA, 253(4):535-539.
Virulence of Legionella anisa strain associated with Pontiac fever: an evaluation using protozoan, cell culture, and guinea pig models.
Microbiological investigations into an outbreak of Pontiac fever due to Legionella micdadei associated with use of whirlpool.
A milder form of legionellosis, Pontiac fever, is an influenza-like illness without pneumonia that resolves on its own.
An outbreak of Pontiac fever due to Legionella longbeachae serogroup 2 found in potting mix in a horticultural nursery in New Zealand.
A less severe form of legionella infection called Pontiac fever does not result in pneumonia and usually resolves without medical intervention.
pneumophila which causes an illness known as "legionellosis,  including a pneumonia-type sickness called Legionnaires' disease and a mild flu-like illness called Pontiac fever". 
In some cases, human exposure to the airborne bacteria spores via inhalation of airborne-contaminated dust or aerosolized liquid droplets can cause a severe respiratory infection, commonly referred to as Legionnaires' disease and Pontiac fever. Water systems in the built environment are the primary reason for the recent (since 1976) emergence of the disease, and there has been a more recent increase of Legionnaires' disease in the United States and many other countries.
Legionella bacteria can cause Legionnaires' disease or Pontiac fever, collectively known as legionellosis.