polyorchidism


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polyorchidism

 [pol″e-or´kĭ-dizm]
the presence of more than two testes.

pol·y·or·chism

, polyorchidism (pol-ē-ōr'kizm, -ōr'kid-izm),
Presence of one or more supernumerary testes.
[poly- + G. orchis, testis]

pol·y·or·chism

, polyorchidism (pol'ē-ōr'kizm, -kid-izm)
Presence of one or more supernumerary testes.
[poly- + G. orchis, testis]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Testicular Doppler US of the scrotum and testicles demonstrated polyorchidism with suggestion of subacute/chronic testicular torsion.
Polyorchidism is a very rare developmental anomaly (14, 22, 23, 56, 57).
Other differential diagnoses include other paratesticular lesions such as spermatocele, hydrocele, varicocele, polyorchidism, intratesticular simple cyst, and tumors of the spermatic cord such as lipoma and leiomyoma.
Less commonly, another congenital abnormality of the male testis, polyorchidism, also known as supernumerary testis, may be associated with germ cell tumor of the testis.
Benign paratesticular lesions include adenomatoid tumours, spermatoceles, cystadenomas, hydroceles, hernias, vericoceles, calculi, polyorchidism, neurofibroma, tunic fibroma, and leiomyoma, while malignant lesions include liposarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, mesothelioma, and papillary serous tumours.
Polyorchidism, alternatively supernumerary testes (SNT), is a condition where an individual is born with more than two testicles [1].
Polyorchidism is rare and can range from testicular duplication alone to duplication of the epididymis or the spermatic cord.
Polyorchidism is an anomaly of the genitourinary tract, with almost 200 cases reported in the literature; it refers to the presence of more than two testes.[sup.1] This congenital anomaly typically causes no impairments, but it is frequently associated with maldescended testis, inguinal hernia and testicular torsion.
This report represents an interesting case of biopsy-proven polyorchidism with torsion of an ipsilateral abnormal bilobed testis that was diagnosed intraoperatively during scrotal exploration for a suspected testicular torsion.
There is a discrepancy in the number of reported cases of polyorchidism. Apparently, <100 cases have been reported to date.