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polymer

 [pol´ĭ-mer]
a compound, usually of high molecular weight, formed by combination of simpler molecules (monomers).

pol·y·mer

(pol'i-mĕr),
A substance of high molecular weight, made up of a chain of repeated units sometimes called "mers."
See also: biopolymer.
[see -mer (1)]

polymer

/poly·mer/ (pol´ĭ-mer) a compound, usually of high molecular weight, formed by the combination of simpler molecules (monomers); it may be formed without formation of any other product (addition p.) or with simultaneous elimination of water or other simple compound (condensation p.) .
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The polymer cellulose consists of linked repeating units of the monomer β-d-glucose.

polymer

[pol′imər]
Etymology: Gk, polys + meros, part
a compound formed by combining or linking a number of monomers, or small molecules. A polymer may be composed of many units of more than one type of monomer (a copolymer) or of many units of the same monomer (a homopolymer).

pol·y·mer

(pol'i-mĕr)
A substance of high molecular weight, made up of a chain of repeated units sometimes called "mers."
See also: -mer (1)

polymer

A chain molecule made up of repetitions of smaller chemical units or molecules called monomers. Polysaccharides, for instance, are long chains made up of repeated units of simpler monosaccharide sugars. Proteins are polymers of AMINO ACIDS. Polymerization is the process of causing many similar or identical small chemical groups to link up to form a long chain. From Greek, poly , many and meros , a part.

polymer

a compound of high molecular weight formed of long chains of repeating units (MONOMERS).

Polymer

A substance formed by joining smaller molecules. For example, plastic, acrylic, cellulose acetate, cellulose propionate, nylon, etc.

polymer

high-molecular-weight compound; formed as a chain of repeated base units

polymer (pˑ·l·mer),

n compound that comprises several repeating units of monomers. See also monomer.

pol·y·mer

(pol'i-mĕr)
Substance of high molecular weight, made up of a chain of repeated units sometimes called "mers."

polymer (pol´emur),

n a longchain hydrocarbon. In dentistry, the polymer is supplied as a powder to be mixed with the monomer for fabrication of appliances and restorations.

polymer

a compound, usually of high molecular weight, formed by combination of simpler molecules (monomers).

polymer-fume fever
References in periodicals archive ?
To create the coating, Klibanov's group chemically modified a commercially available polymer to make its chains highly water-repellent and positively charged.
This conference is said to have a pragmatic focus on the use of new and existing materials in a wide range of electronics applications, giving attendees the opportunity to learn more about just how essential polymers are for the future of the world's electronics industry.
Provide impact enhancement in a number of different polymers for extreme environments.
On the other hand, although metal ion affinities (MAs) are much lower than PAs, polymers can in many cases effectively compete, and are thereby better ionized in this manner.
When the bonds break, the polymers crinkle up and relax.
As the second Chinese company to select Pavilion's solutions, the SECCO project represents the first large-scale deployment of Pavilion's Polymer Solution in China, and underscores Pavilion's commitment to delivering model predictive control (MPC) technology to Chinese manufacturers.
The 50th anniversary of our doctoral program is indeed another milestone in our history; we are looking forward to an enjoyable and memorable celebration in the finest tradition of our polymer programs," said Dr.
For example, Wnek and his colleagues have created fibers from natural polymers, such as collagen and fibrinogen, a protein that contributes to blood clot formation.
Paper 2 The merits of semi-crystalline engineering polymers in healthcare applications
Session 1 on Developments in Medical Thermoplastics will include the following presentations: "Advances in high-performance plastics for medical devices," Jean-Baptiste Bonnadier, Solvay Advanced Polymers, Belgium; "The merits of semi-crystalline engineering polymers in healthcare applications," Ernst A.
To achieve this, some researchers have added a thin layer of nanoscale particles made of alumina silicate to polymer samples.
Volume II discusses individual polymers and their industrial syntheses, Volume III the fundamentals of physical structures and properties, and Volume IV the processing and application of polymers as plastics, fibers, elastomers, thickeners, etc.