polygraph

(redirected from Polygraph examination)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

detector

 [de-tek´ter]
a device by which an object or condition can be discovered.
image detector any recording medium used in radiology, such as film or a cathode ray tube.
lie detector polygraph.

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf),
1. An instrument to obtain simultaneous tracings from several different sources; for example, radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram. The ECG is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the person is questioned about some matter or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; these physiologic changes are presumed to be indicators of emotional reactions, and thus whether the person is telling the truth. Synonym(s): lie detector
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]

polygraph

(pŏl′ē-grăf′)
n.
An instrument that measures the physiological responses of an individual to questions from an examiner who interprets the results as indicating the likelihood that the individual is telling or not telling the truth in giving the answers.
tr.v. poly·graphed, poly·graphing, poly·graphs
To test (a criminal suspect, for example) with a polygraph.

po·lyg′ra·pher (pə-lĭg′rə-fər), po·lyg′ra·phist (-fĭst) n.
pol′y·graph′ic adj.
Commonly called a lie detector. An instrument that measures and records a test subject’s sympathetic nervous system responses—pulse, blood pressure, galvanic skin conductance due to sweating, breathing rhythms, and temperature—to a series of questions, on the premise that true and false answers produce distinctive patterns of response.

polygraph

Lie detector A device designed to detect deception by evaluating physiologic responses to various spoken questions, measuring and recording changes in electrical and mechanical impulses in various parameters–eg, bp, respiratory rate, galvanic skin reflex

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf)
1. An instrument for obtaining simultaneous tracings from several different sources (e.g., radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram). The electrocardiogram is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the subject is interviewed or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; the physiologic changes are presumed to be emotional reactions, and thus indicative of whether the subject is telling the truth.
Synonym(s): lie detector.
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]

polygraph

An instrument that simultaneously records changes in various physiological parameter such as pulse rate, respiration rate, blood pressure and skin resistance changes from sweating. These sensitively reflect alterations in the emotions and the device is used to detect deception in answers to questions. A ‘lie detector’.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1976), Reliability of Chart Interpretation and Sources of Errors in Polygraph Examinations (Report No.
In contrast, on information and belief, Defendant [2] was not required to take a polygraph examination.
Assuming that opposing counsel was not provided with advance notice of the polygraph examination, one must decide when to disclose the existence of the polygraph report, the examiner's name, as well as the name of any expert who may opine on the methods employed by the examiner.
In Wheeler, the NMCCA's analysis of when a trial defense counsel can use evidence of polygraph examinations taken during an accused's interrogation to attack the voluntariness of an accused's subsequent confession is especially valuable.
Military Rules of Evidence 707 decreed: "Notwithstanding any other provision of the law, the results of a polygraph examination, the opinion of a polygraph examiner, or any reference to an offer to take, failure to take, or taking of a polygraph examination, shall not be admitted into evidence."
These assumptions have some commonsense appeal, but they are unsupported by research and don't address whether the accuracy and reliability of neutral polygraph examinations are sufficient to permit them as evidence.
While other agencies waited to see if polygraph examinations would yield favorable results in such an environment, Army examiners proved they could, conducting sensitive examinations to determine the veracity of information reported by known or suspected Taliban and al-Qaeda members.
Because the sample included only cases in which polygraph examinations were conducted in FBI criminal investigations, the results may not generalize to other contexts.
It seems unlikely that an opinion of an expert about credibility based on a polygraph examination is less reliable than the testimony of a witness whose recollection has been "enhanced" by hypnotism.
The DOD study noted that the high error rates that concerned the OTA were found in the "blind" evaluations - opinions based on the paper records, not the opinions of evaluators who themselves administered the polygraph examination.(52) There is a good reason why blind evaluations are less valid than examiner evaluations, especially with respect to innocent subjects.
Late Friday night June 18 - following five hours of questioning by the FBI that included a polygraph examination - Wuerl admitted through her lawyer that she had fabricated the incident.
The basic tool for predicting honesty has been the polygraph examination or lie detector test.