polygenism

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polygenism

(pə-lĭj′ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
The discredited theory that humans of different races are descended from different ancestors. Also called polygeny.

po·lyg′e·nist n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As Stocking notes, the most important point for many commentators on kinship at this time, and clearly Fison was among them, was the suggestion of dispersion across climatic zones which challenged the polygenist insistence that human groups arose separately (1995:18).
Graves 2005a demonstrates that the polygenist theory of human origins was the most popular naturalist view of the 19th century in both the United States and United Kingdom.
It also states claims that follow logically from polygenist as well as evolutionary theoy.
Stanton sees the polygenists as important precursors of Darwin by discrediting earlier monogenic theories heavily dependent on Genesis.
The polygenists asked a pointed question: If the races were unchanged from the dawn of time, then how could the effects of the environment have altered them in the short time since the Creation?
Here, it would seem that Emerson is endorsing a doctrine of the immutability of racial characteristics that would agree with the position of the polygenists.
Monogenists (secular and religious) and Polygenists in the SEP
Quatrefages replied that polygenists in the United States had in fact used their theories to justify slavery.
Their issues were the fertility of hybrid species in zoology, the accuracy of Genesis, and the sources of African inferiority, which both monogenists and polygenists assumed.
Monogenists and polygenists cited the example of the Jews in proof or refutation of ideological positions on the innate or environmental origins of race.
Naturalists divided roughly into two camps: the polygenists (those who argued for several distinct origins of the races) and the monogenists (those who argued for one origin to all human kinds).
Augustine and others, and while the settlers were not necessarily polygenists, they tended to magnify racial differences to suit their own ends.