ether

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ether

 [e´ther]
1. an organic compound containing an oxygen atom bonded to two carbon atoms.
2. diethyl or ethyl ether: a colorless, transparent, mobile, very volatile, highly flammable liquid with a characteristic odor; it was the first inhalational anesthetic used for surgical anesthesia, but is now rarely used in the United States or Canada because of its flammability.

e·ther

(ē'thĕr),
1. Any organic compound in which two carbon atoms are independently linked to a common oxygen atom, thus containing the group -C-O-C-.
See also: epoxy.
2. Loosely used to refer to diethyl ether or an anesthetic ether, although a large number of ethers have anesthetic properties. For individual ethers, see the specific name.
[G. aithēr, the pure upper air]

ether

(ē′thər)
n.
1. Any of a class of organic compounds in which two hydrocarbon groups are linked by an oxygen atom.
2. A volatile, highly flammable liquid, C4H10O, derived from distilling ethyl alcohol with sulfuric acid, used as a reagent and solvent, and formerly used as an anesthetic. Also called diethyl ether, ethyl ether.
3. The regions of space beyond the earth's atmosphere; the heavens.
4. The element believed in ancient and medieval civilizations to fill all space above the sphere of the moon and to compose the stars and planets.
5. Physics An all-pervading, infinitely elastic, massless medium formerly postulated as the medium of propagation of electromagnetic waves.

e·ther′ic (ĭ-thĕr′ĭk, ĭ-thîr′-) adj.

e·ther

(ē'thĕr)
1. Any organic compound in which two carbon atoms are independently linked to a common oxygen atom, thus containing the group -C-O-C-.
See also: epoxy
2. Loosely used to refer to diethyl ether.
[G. aithēr, the pure upper air]

ether

A volatile and highly inflammable liquid once widely used as a safe and effective drug for the induction and continuance of general anaesthesia. Induction is slow and unpleasant and deep anaesthesia is needed for muscle relaxation. Postoperative nausea is common. Because of these disadvantages and the danger of explosion, ether is now seldom used. The drug is, however, on the WHO official list.

e·ther

(ē'thĕr)
Any organic compound in which two carbon atoms are independently linked to a common oxygen atom, but commonly used to refer to diethyl ether or an anesthetic ether, although a large number of ethers have anesthetic properties.
[G. aithēr, the pure upper air]
References in periodicals archive ?
Hydrogen bonding between the NH group and urethane or CO groups of urea is accountable for the phase segregation behavior for both polyester and polyether based elastomers.
The introduction of the soft polyether segments also led to the reduction of melting point of the polymers.
* DMP (N,N-dimethylpiperazine) general-purpose catalyst for flexible and semi-flexible polyether foam.
Other variations of resin can be made by combining both polyester and polyether glycols.
MPE-B has higher modulus, tensile and tear strength than the polyethers MPE-A and C.
The shortcomings in the mechanical properties of polyethers have traditionally been compensated for the use of a high density surface layer, or integral skin layer.
Whereas Arco's low-monol polyethers are limited to prepolymer production methods, EO-capped Pluracol HP polyols can be used in both prepolymer processes and in one-shot methods such as casting and injection molding.
The polyols are usually either a polyether or polyester.
Stat-Rite itself is described as a high-molecular-weight polyether copolymer based on urethane chemistry.
Also furnishes polyether catalysts in the Texacat line:
will report on polyurea foams made with certain high-molecular-weight, amine-terminated polyethers. These foams were molded with high-pressure impingement mixing in a manner similar to RIM.
* Texacat DM-70 is used in flexible polyethers, polyesters and HR molded foams.