polyene

(redirected from Polyenes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Related to Polyenes: Azoles

polyene

 [pol´e-ēn]
1. a chemical compound with a carbon chain of four or more atoms and several conjugated double bonds.
2. any of a group of antibiotic antifungal agents with similar structure, such as amphotericin b, candicidin, or nystatin; they are produced by species of Streptomyces that damage cell membranes by forming complexes with sterols.

pol·y·ene

(pol'ē-ēn),
A chemical compound having a series of conjugated (alternating) double bonds; for example, the carotenoids.
References in periodicals archive ?
Polyene drugs such as amphotericin B and nystatin bind to ergosterol in the plasma membrane, leading to cell death by promoting membrane leakage.
Polyenes are lipophilic compounds acting on the cell membrane and are fungicidal in action.
fluconazole and voriconazole and ketoconazole representing the azoles, and amphotericin B from the polyene. Isolates were considered multidrug resistant if they were resistant to one or more representative antifungal(s).9
The systemic antifungal classes currently available are polyenes, triazoles, echinocandins, and flucytosine.
glabrata strains (9.9%) were likely to be resistant to AMB as follows: five strains exhibited MIC of 2 [micro] g/mL, one strain presented MIC of 4 [micro] g/mL, and three strains exhibited MIC of 8 [micro]g/ml to this polyene agent.
An early example of what this process could lead to is Burke's work on one particular polyene compound, an extremely valuable but also highly toxic antifungal drug called amphotericin.
Common drugs used against candidiasis are amphotericin B and fluconazole belonging to polyenes and azoles groups of antifungal agents, respectively (Ashley et al., 2006).
This volume contains 13 chapters on antifungal research from a molecular and genomic perspective, discussing the molecular mechanisms responsible for antifungal resistance to the classical molecules, azoles, polyenes, and echinocandins; fungal biofilms; fungal-specific biological pathways that constitute potential new targets; drug combinations as a strategy to potentiate existing antifungal agents; strategies for the identification of the mode of action of antifungal drug candidates; the impact of high-throughput screenings of chemical compound collections; modulating the host response; antifungal vaccines and immunotherapeutics; and animal models.
Lipids containing methylene-interrupted dienes or polyenes show a shift in the position of the double bond during the oxidation due to isomerization and the formation of CD.
The first degradation step, which is at the temperature up to about 369T, presents the process of dehydrochlorination and the formation of polyenes caused by PVC and CPE (33).
For instance azoles, polyenes and allylamines target ergosterol pathway.