dimethicone

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dimethicone

 [di-meth´ĭ-kōn]
a silicone oil used as a skin protectant; available as an ointment, spray, and cream. See also simethicone.

di·meth·i·cone

(dī-meth'i-kōn),
A silicone oil consisting of dimethylsiloxane polymers, usually incorporated into a petrolatum base or a nongreasy preparation and used for the protection of normal skin against various, chiefly industrial, skin irritants; may also be used to prevent diaper dermatitis.

di·meth·i·cone

(dī-meth'i-kōn)
A silicone oil consisting of dimethylsiloxane polymers, usually incorporated into a petrolatum base or a nongreasy preparation and used for the protection of normal skin against various, chiefly industrial, skin irritants; may also be used to prevent diaper dermatitis.

dimethicone

Dimeticone, simethicone, a drug that reduces surface tension on gas bubbles in the intestine so that they can coalesce and the gas can be more readily expelled. The drug is widely used in preparations for babies for the relief of colic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparative studies on the interaction of proteins with a polydimethylsiloxane elastomer.
The most common type of silicone is comprised of polydimethylsiloxane polymers (PDMS) from dimethyl groups, which facilitate strong physical properties such as tensile, tear strength and elongation.
polydimethylsiloxane (linear type)) have been blended with other polymers, but the results showed that silicon-containing polymers themselves did not provide enough flame retardancy for the composites to meet applications requirements [1, 3, 5, 10, 24-29].
Hydride terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, MW = 400, b.p.
[ClickPress, Mon Sep 10 2018] Under the prominent influence of macro- and microeconomic factors, the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) market is anticipated to witness a steady growth trajectory in the coming decade, as per Fact.MR valuation.
The kit contains a catalyst, filler and the polydimethylsiloxane polymer.
Three years ago, the team, in collaboration with Lisa DeLouise, Ph.D., MPD, of Rochester, N.Y., perfected a low-cost, easy fabrication technique to make spherical cavities in PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane), a widely used silicon organic polymer.
Dime-thylphenylsilane from Fluka, hydride-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, Mw = 400 g/mol), and platinum-divinyltetramethyldisiloxane-complex (Karstedt's catalyst) from United Chemical Technologies Inc.
Organomodification of the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) backbone to form silicone-based additives unlocks a wealth of performance benefits that formulators can draw upon for a wide range of high-technology coatings.
They then hit on the idea of using a polymer called polydimethylsiloxane, which is thick and viscous at room temperature, spinning the mixture on glass plates to make extremely thin films.