entomophily

(redirected from Pollinated by insects)

entomophily

the POLLINATION of plants by insects. Such animal pollinators are one of the two main mechanisms for the transport of pollen to the stigma, the other being ANEMOPHILY. In entomophilous flowers the colours are adapted to their pollinators, for example, moths are mainly active at dusk and at night and they visit flowers that are mostly white; bees cannot see red and will visit mainly blue or yellow flowers. Many flowers have patterns visible only with ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT which insects (but not mammals) can detect. Deep flowers are pollinated by insects with long mouthparts, and short flowers by insects with short mouthparts, an example of COEVOLUTION of plants and insects.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bleddyn Lake, spokesman for the organisation, said the UK has lost up to 98% of its wild flower areas since World War Two - and that threequarters of the food we eat is pollinated by insects.
Seed Savers Exchange offers free.pdf documents online, such as a crop-specific guide that details cultivars, whether they're pollinated by insects, the wind, or are self-pollinating, and how far you need to isolate them from the same species to ensure pure genetics.
Raspberries are self-fertilising and pollinated by insects, so avoid a windy spot at all costs.
The pollen's structure suggests that the plants were pollinated by insects: most likely beetles, as bees would not evolve for another 100 million years.
Most fruit trees are pollinated by insects so you'll need to avoid windy sites, and add plenty of organic matter to the soil, which needs to be well-drained.
Holly trees are pollinated by insects but the seed must pass through a bird's gut before germination.
Most flowers are pollinated by insects, and so much of our food relies on this activity."
Carrots have perfect flowers, but they need to be pollinated by insects.
He has developed new and improved self-pollinating almond trees--ones that can produce a bountiful harvest without being pollinated by insects.
First, some moth larvae eat them; second a long list of organisms has been found to be trapped in them; third, they are pollinated by insects; and fourth, some insect larvae and other organisms manage to live in the digestive fluid in the pitchers of a few of them, especially Sarracenia purpurea L.
In fact, of 775 tropical plants used as food by people, 88 percent are pollinated by insects. Waldbauer is an entomologist with an unwavering verve for his pursuits.