pole

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pole

 [pōl]
1. either extremity of any axis, as of the fetal ellipse or a body organ.
2. either one of two points that have opposite physical qualities (electric or other). adj., adj po´lar.
cephalic pole the end of the fetal ellipse at which the head of the fetus is situated.
frontal pole the most prominent part of the anterior end of each cerebral hemisphere.
occipital pole the posterior end of the occipital lobe of the brain.
pelvic pole the end of the fetal ellipse at which the breech of the fetus is situated.
temporal pole the prominent anterior end of the temporal lobe of the brain.

pole

(pōl), [TA]
1. One of two points at the extremities of the axis of any organ or body.
2. Either of two points on a sphere at the greatest distance from its equator.
3. One of two points in a magnet or an electric battery or cell having extremes of opposite properties; the negative pole is a cathode, the positive pole an anode.
4. Either end of a spindle.
5. Either of the differentiated zones at opposite ends of an axis in a cell, organ, or organism.
Synonym(s): polus [TA]
[L. polus, the end of an axis, pole, fr. G. polos]

pole

(pōl)
n.
Biology
1. Either extremity of the main axis of a nucleus, cell, or organism.
2. Either end of the spindle formed in a cell during mitosis.
3. The point on a nerve cell where a process originates.

pole

(pōl) [TA]
1. One of the two points at the extremities of the axis of any organ or body.
2. Either of the two points on a sphere at the greatest distance from the equator.
3. One of the two points in a magnet or an electric battery or cell having extremes of opposite properties; the negative pole is a cathode, the positive pole an anode.
4. Either end of a spindle.
5. Either of the differentiated zones at opposite ends of an axis in a cell, organ, or organism.
Synonym(s): polus [TA] .
[L. polus, the end of an axis, pole, fr. G. polos]
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike most temperate areas, in the lowland tropics there is no community of species adapted to even hotter areas available to replace those species that shift their ranges upslope or poleward. Thus, the species diversity of lowland tropical areas is expected to decrease as global temperatures rise (Colwell et al.
Dan Bebber of the university said: "If crop pests continue to march polewards as the Earth warms, the combined effects of a growing world population and the increased loss of crops to pests will pose a serious threat to global food security."
They found that on average, the pests were moving polewards at a rate of 2.7 kilometres per year, although there was significant variation in the trends among the different taxonomic groups.