Podophyllum peltatum


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A perennial herb once used as an anthelmintic, emetic, purgative, and liver tonic; its marked purgative activity precludes its therapeutic use; a semisynthetic derivative, etoposide, is used to treat cancers
Toxicity Dermatitis, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, severe gastroenteritis, and possibly death; mayapple is regarded by the FDA as ‘unsafe’

Podophyllum peltatum,

n See mayapple.

Podophyllum peltatum

Northern American plant in the family Berberidaceae; contains podophyllum resin which causes diarrhea; called also American mandrake, mayapple.
References in periodicals archive ?
The structure of the vegetative shoot apex of Podophyllum peltatum remains consistent over the seasonal cycle.
Erigenia bulbosa, Erythronium americanum, Geranium maculatum, Geum vernum, Hydrophyllum macrophyllum, Isopyrum biternatum, Jeffersonia diphylla, Maianthemum racemosum, Osmorhiza longistylis, Packera obovata, Phlox divaricata, Podophyllum peltatum, Sanguinaria canadensis, Stellaria pubera, Trillium grandiflora, T.
macrophyllum, Maianthemum racemosum, Osmorhiza longistylis, Packera obovata, Phlox divaricata, Podophyllum peltatum, Polygonatum biflorum, Sanguinaria canadensis, Trillium spp.
These include Arisaema dracontium, Arisaema triphyllum (Jack-in-the-pulpit), Blephilia hirsuta (hairy wood mint), Desmodium glutinosum (pointed-leaf tick trefoil), Phytolacca americana (the abundant pokeweed), Podophyllum peltatum (mayapple), and Stachys tenuifolia (smooth hedge-nettle).
Spring dominants in the herbaceous layer were Hydrophyllum macrophyllum, Podophyllum peltatum, and Cardamine concatenata (Fig.