Streptococcus pneumoniae

(redirected from Pneumococcal disease)

Streptococcus

 [strep″to-kok´us]
a genus of gram-positive, facultatively aerobic cocci (family Streptococcaceae) occurring in pairs or chains. It is separable into the pyogenic group, the viridans group, the enterococcus group, and the lactic group. The first group includes the beta-hemolytic human and animal pathogens; the second and third include alpha-hemolytic parasitic forms occurring as normal flora in the upper respiratory tract and the intestinal tract, respectively; and the fourth is made up of saprophytic forms.
Streptococcus mu´tans a species implicated in dental caries.
Streptococcus pneumo´niae a small, slightly elongated, encapsulated coccus, one end of which is pointed or lance-shaped; the organisms commonly occur in pairs. This is the most common cause of lobar pneumonia, and it also causes serious forms of meningitis, septicemia, empyema, and peritonitis. There are some 80 serotypes distinguished by the polysaccharide hapten of the capsular substance. Called also pneumococcus.
Streptococcus pyo´genes a beta-hemolytic, toxigenic, pyogenic species that causes septic sore throat, scarlet fever, rheumatic fever, puerperal fever, acute glomerulonephritis, and other conditions in humans.

Strep·to·coc·cus pneu·mo·ni·ae

a species of gram-positive, lancet-shaped cocci and diplococci frequently occurring in chains; cells are readily lysed by bile salts. Virulent forms are enclosed in type-specific polysaccharide capsules, the basis for an effective vaccine. Normal inhabitants of the respiratory tract, and the most common cause of lobar pneumonia, they are the most common causative agents of meningitis, and pneumonia worldwide, and also cause otitis media, sinusitis, and other infections. It is the type species of the former genus Diplococcus.

Streptococcus pneumoniae

Microbiology A pathogenic streptococcus with 90 serotypes associated with pneumonia, bacteremia, meningitis Transmission Person to person Incidence Before 2000, S pneumoniae infections caused 100K-135K hospitalizations for pneumonia, 6 million cases of otitis media, and 60K cases of invasive disease–including 3300 cases of meningitis; sterile-site infections have a geographic variation of 21-33/105 Risk groups Elderly, children < age 2, African Americans, Native Americans, day care center inmates, and persons with underlying medical conditions including HIV infection and sickle-cell disease Prophylaxis 88% of clinical isolates of S pneumoniae are serotypes in the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine. See Meningitis.

Strep·to·coc·cus pneu·mo·ni·ae

(strep'tō-kok'ŭs nū-mō'nē-ē)
A bacterial species of gram-positive, lancet-shaped diplococci frequently occurring in pairs or chains. Virulent forms are enclosed in type-specific polysaccharide capsules. Normal inhabitants of the respiratory tract, and the cause of lobar pneumonia, otitis media, meningitis, sinusitis, and other infections.
Synonym(s): pneumococcus.

Strep·to·coc·cus pneu·mo·ni·ae

(strep'tō-kok'ŭs nū-mō'nē-ē)
A bacterial species of gram-positive, lancet-shaped diplococci frequently occurring in pairs or chains. Normal inhabitants of the respiratory tract, and the cause of lobar pneumonia, otitis media, meningitis, sinusitis, and other infections.
Synonym(s): pneumococcus.

Patient discussion about Streptococcus pneumoniae

Q. What Is Streptococcal Pneumonia? I have heard that I might have streptococcal pneumonia. What exactly does that mean?

A. Streptococcal pneumonia is a disease caused by the streptoccus bacteria. It is one of the most common causes of pneumonia in healthy people. You can learn more about bacterial pneumonia here-
http://www.5min.com/Video/Pneumonia---Viral-or-Bacterial--9552

More discussions about Streptococcus pneumoniae
References in periodicals archive ?
Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is a part of normal flora of nasopharynx, but can cause a variety of infections in the general population.1 Majority of these infections are non-invasive, such as otitis media, but some invasive infections, like meningitis, bacteraemia and pneumonia, can be life-threatening.2 Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is defined as an infection confirmed by the isolation of S.
"This revised recommendation reinforces that Prevnar 13 is considered safe and effective by the FDA and ACIP and helps address remaining persistent vaccine type pneumococcal disease in the population of adults age 65 years or older, which causes thousands of pneumococcal pneumonia cases every year in the United States.
With an increase in pneumococcal disease due to causative serotype, the need for vaccines with broader coverage has increased.
Since its introduction as a 2+1 dosing schedule in 2006, overall levels of invasive pneumococcal disease, which causes diseases such as meningitis, sepsis and pneumonia, have fallen significantly in the UK, especially in children.1 However, following advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation based on modellingl and a small immunogenicity study in 213 infants,2 the UK Government has decided to drop one of the primary doses and implement a 1+1 dosing schedule.
M2 PHARMA-March 19, 2019-China National Biotec Group, ImmunoBiology Enter Licensing Agreement to Co-Develop Next Generation Vaccine against Pneumococcal Disease in Greater China
Diseases such as influenza, pneumococcal disease and herpes zoster have long been recognised as causing a high burden in the elderly.
Professor Dr Rai Asghar Ahmed while speaking on the occasion said that about 30,000 deaths of infants are reported annually in Pakistan due to pneumococcal disease.
Of note, German investigators also have recently reported a rebound in invasive pneumococcal disease in German children under 16 years of age.
Pneumococcal pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease, Influenza, Hepatitis A & B, Typhoid, Herpes Zoster, Diphtheria, Tetanus and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infections are some of the diseases that adults can safeguard themselves against through vaccination.
Invasive pneumococcal disease is defined as an infection caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from a normally sterile site such as blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and pleural, joint, or peritoneal fluid.
Only 35%, for example, believed they were at least somewhat likely to contract pneumococcal pneumonia/ pneumococcal disease, even though published data shows that adults with diabetes are about three times more likely to develop those ailments than healthy adults of the same age.

Full browser ?