plyometrics

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Related to Plyometric exercise: isometric exercise, Plyometrics

plyometrics

(plī-ō-mĕt′rĭks)
An exercise technique that combines strength with speed to achieve maximum power in functional movements. This regimen combines eccentric training of muscles with concentric contraction.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The bowling speed after performing 50% of BSP was 1.85km/h faster than the bowling speed recorded after 30% of BSR This could be due to the difference in terms of repetitions of the exercises between the 2 conditions although there is some research that shows that plyometric exercise leads to fatigue and may hinder the explosive performance of the athlete (20).
Part III goes into great detail on testing and assessment methods for strength using plyometric exercises, as well as the "tool kit" necessary for training (cones, boxes, hurdles, foam barriers, steps, and weighted objects).
Plyometric exercise intensity has been defined as the amount of stress the PE places on the muscle, connective tissue and joints [5].
The patient was progressed to plyometric exercises to maximize strength gains and enhance proprioception.
* Advanced or intense plyometric exercises should be done with the advice of a trainer.
Plyometric exercise is designed to produce fast, powerful movements, and to improve the functions of the nervous system.
The plyometric group performed 3 sets of 8 repetitions of 4 different lower-body plyometric exercises twice a week.
In one of the rare studies that reported the effects of plyometric exercise training on anthropometric indices in female volleyball players of advanced level, authors noted no significant influence on participants' body mass (Lehnert et al., 2017).
A comparison of the symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage following an initial and repeated bout of plyometric exercise in men and boys.
Existing information shows that regular plyometric exercise can increase strength and power of adult persons [2,3].
Consistent with the results of the present study, Goodall and Howatson (2008) reported that neither muscle damaging plyometric exercise nor a CWI recovery protocol affected knee flexion.
Fatourous IG, Jamurtas AZ, Leontsini D, Taxildaris K, Aggelousis N, Kostopoulos N, Buckenmeyer P, 2000, Evaluation of plyometric exercise training, weight training, and their combination on vertical jump and leg strength.