plosive

(redirected from Plosives)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

plo·sive

(plō'siv),
Speech sound made by impounding the air stream for a moment and then suddenly releasing it.

plo·sive

(plō'siv)
Speech sound made by impounding the air stream for a moment and then suddenly releasing it.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another study that was also conducted with adults [21], analyzed the differences between the VOT duration measures of plosive consonants [p, t, k] in the speech production of 14 bilingual individuals (Spanish-English), aged 18 to 24 years.
The only poetic practices that he acknowledges as antiquated are common syllables where short vowels are followed by plosives and nasals (remarkably, this is his own observation, informed by his reading of Priscian and possibly his own more extensive knowledge of classical verse) and the use of hiatus, with or without correption, of a diphthong or a long vowel.
* They are associated with the voiceless plosives /k t p/, in descending order.
Even for sounds usually perceived as nonlinguistic such as the Hindi plosive contrast, and for two English contrasts usually perceived as a single category, significant individual differences in personality have surfaced.
In the classical study of Lisker and Abramson (1964) plosives are divided into three major types on the basis of VOT.
all sort o' wrong." The insistent alliteration, heavy with plosive d and t sounds, of the basileml line, "Dern dutty mout' wid lyin' stain'," which harshly censors the dirty and dishonest speech of the police, emphatically affirms the truth-telling power of the Apple-Woman's vernacular speech.
voiced clusters may very well correspond to a historically intermediate stage in the development of Gawri /l/ and /l/ from ancient clusters with (dental and velar) plosives and /r/, in whose final stage a "new" phoneme /l/ emerged through assimilation, while the /dr/-clusters fused with an already existing /l/ phoneme.
The starting motivation for this comparison was Leho Vork's (1972) impressionistic description of some differences between Estonian and Finnish short/single plosives. According to Vork (1972 : 14), "a word-initial [invariably short] plosive in native Estonian words and in old loanwords is regularly written using the graphemes p, t, k.
Unvoiced and voiced consonants were initially positioned on left and right sides of the circle, connected at the bottom across the voiced and unvoiced affricates, and connected at the top across voiced and unvoiced plosives. Then the location of each consonant was modified as an average of its initial position and weighted by its hit rate and the position of every other consonant weighted by the frequency of false responses to that consonant.
Presumably, it was the wresting of peace from juxtaposed plosives that caught Tennyson's notice, and Gray is surely right to suggest that he sought to recreate the effect in his own verse.
For practical reasons in the account which follows examples will be split into four groups, the first one embracing graphemes corresponding to plosives, i.e.