plosive

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plo·sive

(plō'siv),
Speech sound made by impounding the air stream for a moment and then suddenly releasing it.

plosive

See stop.

plo·sive

(plō'siv)
Speech sound made by impounding the air stream for a moment and then suddenly releasing it.

plosive (plō´siv),

n any speech sound made by impounding the airstream for a moment until considerable pressure has been developed and then suddenly releasing it (e.g.,
b, d, and
g). One of two types of stop consonants, the other being affricative (e.g.,
ch).
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References in periodicals archive ?
From among the target words of that larger study all those words were chosen for this experiment that contained initial and/or medial plosives.
An instrumental analysis of the words with intervocalic plosives gave the following results.
Plosives and liquids occurred disproportionately in words and had steeper performance/SNR functions than the nonsibilant fricatives that occurred disproportionately in nonsense syllables [20].
For other words it is obvious that the aspiration was present in the OIA form, although originally associated with another segment, such as (item 12 above) gostha (Turner 1966: 4336), but has since been transferred from the voiceless plosive at the onset of the second syllable to the initial syllable in NP and SP.
That part of the grammar provides a description of Late Middle English shifts of quantity, including geminate simplification, metatheses, distant assimilation and dissimilation, various qualitative changes, including modifications of word-final homorganic clusters, loss of consonants with velar articulation ([x, 1, r]), continuations of earlier changes, haplology, transformations in the sequence consonant + [j] leading to the rise of new palatal sounds, loss of plosives in certain consonant sequences, loss of [h], modifications of the initial clusters with [w].
are more likely to preserve a trochaic stress pattern in binomials), contain more initial and final consonants, have a more obstruent final segment, and are more likely to begin and end with a voiced obstruent and a plosive.
Degen], that "positional allophones of the plosives could only begin to function after the interdental phonemes /d, t/ had shifted to /d, t/ respectively": allophones do not "function"; and the partial overlap of allophones of distinct phonemes in specific environments is a common phenomenon, e.
The compliancy of tissue allows for more cavity expansion, which in turn allows for longer durations of vocal fold vibration during more anterior plosives.
On the other hand, a change in stimulation site could be recognized over the shorter durations of consonants [105] and was thus appropriate for transmitting the frequency shifts seen in the consonants characterized as plosives (/b/, /d/, /g/, /p/, /t/, /k/) and nasals (/m/, /n/, /ng/).
Nowadays, both pronunciations with voiced and voiceless bilabial plosives are accepted.
The P represents bilabial plosives, the T alveolar plosives, the S alveolar fricatives, the F labiodental fricatives, and the X velar fricatives.
Furthermore, this 't' inter-plays with other plosives, with the glottal stop and with the semi-consonant 'w' in ways that the classical language has formalized in theme VIII - as in iddakhara 'to store' from dh-kh-r, ittaqa 'he guarded himself' from w-q-y, etc.