plinth

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plinth

 [plinth]
1. a padded table for a patient to sit on or lie on while performing exercises, receiving a massage, or undergoing other physical therapy treatments.
2. a waterproof table used in a hydrotherapy tub to facilitate exercise and movement in the water.

plinth

(plinth) [Gr. plinthos, squared stone, tile]
A table, seat, or apparatus on which a patient lies or sits while doing remedial exercise or undergoing examination.
References in periodicals archive ?
The plinths will now help staff treat patients more comfortably and with ease, thanks to their cushioned and sturdy design.
Drill 4 holes in each corner on your pencil marks, this will allow you to get the jigsaw blade through the plinth and start cutting out the hole to fit the vent.
But if you're a terror group and you erect a plinth without permission the powers that be will have to "consult with the community" before anything is done.
In addition to the plinths, five small crosses have been inlaid flush with the finished ground surface, representing the five Victoria Crosses that were won.
Ministry spokesmen today denied that the plinths were breaking up and said the cracks were only very tiny and of no structural significance whatever.
For Bill Woodrow, commenting on his piece on the vacant plinth in Trafalgar Square, it was the form of the space itself, rather than the patterns of use, which bore on the possible object.
David Beckham, pigeons and even a stiff upper lip were suggested, but the vacant plinth in London's Trafalgar Square should be an ever-changing display of contemporary art, it was recommended.
For example, the plinths must be poured to within one-sixteenth of an inch - about the width of a penny - of specification.
Both organisations said the plinths, with inscriptions dedicated to the "glorious memory" of the UDA, UVF and Red Hand Commando, were not part of the original plans for the pounds 74,000 project.
The artist, famous as the creator of The Angel of the North, is seeking 2,400 people - including 103 from the North East - to spend an hour each on a plinth in London's Trafalgar Square.
At first, the whole design seems very simple: big plinth with metal boxes on top penetrated by portico, a bold, monumental, almost classical composition needed to bring order to the campus.
The Victorian architect of the square, Charles Barry, intended to erect equestrian statues to the most recently deceased British kings, George IV and William IV, on a matching pair of large plinths at the north end, near the National Gallery.