pleural cavity

(redirected from Pleural diseases)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

cavity

 [kav´ĭ-te]
1. a hollow or space, or a potential space, within the body or one of its organs; called also caverna and cavum.
2. the lesion produced by dental caries.
Cavities in the body. From Applegate, 2000.
abdominal cavity the cavity of the body between the diaphragm above and the pelvis below, containing the abdominal organs.
absorption c's cavities in developing compact bone due to osteoclastic erosion, usually occurring in the areas laid down first.
amniotic cavity the closed sac between the embryo and the amnion, containing the amniotic fluid.
cranial cavity the space enclosed by the bones of the cranium.
glenoid cavity a depression in the lateral angle of the scapula for articulation with the humerus.
marrow cavity (medullary cavity) the cavity that contains bone marrow in the diaphysis of a long bone; called also medullary canal.
nasal cavity the proximal portion of the passages of the respiratory system, extending from the nares to the pharynx; it is divided into left and right halves by the nasal septum and is separated from the oral cavity by the hard palate.
oral cavity the cavity of the mouth, bounded by the jaw bones and associated structures (muscles and mucosa).
pelvic cavity the space within the walls of the pelvis.
pericardial cavity the potential space between the epicardium and the parietal layer of the serous pericardium.
peritoneal cavity the potential space between the parietal and the visceral peritoneum.
pleural cavity the potential space between the two layers of pleura.
pulp cavity the pulp-filled central chamber in the crown of a tooth.
cavity of septum pellucidum the median cleft between the two laminae of the septum pellucidum. Called also pseudocele, pseudocoele, and fifth ventricle.
serous cavity a coelomic cavity, like that enclosed by the pericardium, peritoneum, or pleura, not communicating with the outside of the body and lined with a serous membrane, i.e., one which secretes a serous fluid.
tension cavity cavities of the lung in which the air pressure is greater than that of the atmosphere.
thoracic cavity the portion of the ventral body cavity situated between the neck and the diaphragm; it contains the pleural cavity.
tympanic cavity the major portion of the middle ear, consisting of a narrow air-filled cavity in the temporal bone that contains the auditory ossicles and communicates with the mastoid air cells and the mastoid antrum by means of the aditus and the nasopharynx by means of the auditory tube. The middle ear and the tympanic cavity were formerly regarded as being synonymous.
uterine cavity the flattened space within the uterus communicating proximally on either side with the fallopian tubes and below with the vagina.

pleur·al cav·i·ty

[TA]
the potential space between the parietal and visceral layers of the pleura.

pleural cavity

n.
The space that develops between the two pleurae when there is fluid between them. Also called pleural space.

pleur·al cav·i·ty

(plūr'ăl kav'i-tē) [TA]
The potential space between the parietal and visceral layers of the pleura.
Synonym(s): pleural space.

pleural cavity

a coelomic cavity surrounding the lungs of mammals that is separated from the rest of the perivisceral coelom by the DIAPHRAGM. The cavity is fluid-filled and small, as the lungs and body wall are in close proximity to each other.

Pleural cavity

The area of the chest that includes the lining of the chest cavity, the space the lungs are located in, and the membrane covering of the lungs.
References in periodicals archive ?
This review has examined the literature in each major diagnostic category of pleural disease regarding chest drain size, and compared the role, effectiveness and complications of drain size in the management of each condition specifically.
In May 2014, an institutional need was felt for standardizing pleural disease care in response to observed institutional variation in pleural care and low performance on a publicly reportable healthcare quality measure (Patient Safety Indicator # 6 measuring rates of iatrogenic pneumothorax).
Dowdeswell IRG 1998 Pleural diseases In: Stein JH 1998 Internal Medicine New York, Mosby.
In 2004, a database for pleural diseases was constructed to be pro-spectively filled in the department.
Advances in pleural diseases: what is the future for medical thoracoscopy?
Most pleural diseases present with pleural effusion.
Pleural Diseases. Current Medical Diagnosis and treatment 2005;9:296-9.
KEY WORDS: Abram's needle, Lung cancer, Pleural Diseases, Sensitivity and Specificity.
Pleural diseases observations on pleural fluid pressure as fluid is withdrawn during thoracentesis.
Diagnostic procedures for pleural diseases. Symposium of pleural diseases.
Medical thoracoscopy is used for cases of exudative pleural effusions in which a definitive diagnosis cannot be reached by conventional diagnostic methods for the diagnosis of pleural diseases. The conventional methods include clinical, radiological, laboratory and cytological investigations, which are performed routinely in many clinics.