pleiotropy

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pleiotropy

 [pli-ot´rŏ-pe]
the production by a single gene of multiple phenotypic effects. The term is often used to refer to a single gene defect that is expressed as problems in multiple systems of the body, such as in osteogenesis imperfecta, where the gene causes defects in several different systems that contain collagen.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

plei·ot·ro·py

, pleiotropia (plī-ot'rō-pē, plī-ō-trō'pē-ă),
Production by a single mutant gene of apparently unrelated multiple effects at the clinical or phenotypic level.
[pleio- + G. tropos, turning]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pleiotropy

(plī-ŏt′rə-pē) also

pleiotropism

(-pĭz′əm)
n. Biology
The production of diverse effects, especially the production by a single gene of several distinct and seemingly unrelated phenotypic effects.

plei′o·tro′pic (plī′ə-trō′pĭk, -trŏp′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

plei·ot·ro·py

, pleiotropia (plī-ot'rŏ-pē, -ō-trō'pē-ă)
Production by a single mutant gene of apparently unrelated multiple effects at the clinical or phenotypic level.
[pleio- + G. tropos, turning]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012