plastid

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plastid

 [plas´tid]
1. any elementary constructive unit, as a cell.
2. any specialized organ of the cell other than the nucleus and centrosome, such as chloroplast or amyloplast.

plas·tid

(plas'tid),
1. One of the differentiated structures in cytoplasm of plant cells where photosynthesis or other cellular processes take place; plasid contain DNA and are self-replicating. Synonym(s): trophoplast
2. One of the granules of foreign or differentiated matter, food particles, fat, waste material, chromatophores, trichocysts, etc., in cells.
3. A self-duplicating viruslike particle that multiplies within a host cell, such as κ particles in certain paramecia.
[G. plastos, formed, + -id]

plastid

(plăs′tĭd)
n.
Any of several cytoplasmic organelles, such as chloroplasts, that contain genetic material, have a double membrane, and are often pigmented. Plastids are found in plants, algae, and certain other eukaryotic organisms and have various physiological functions, such as the synthesis and storage of food.

plas·tid′i·al (plăs-tĭd′ē-əl) adj.

plas·tid

(plas'tid)
1. One of the differentiated structures in cytoplasm of plant cells where photosynthesis or other cellular processes are carried on; contain DNA and are self replicating.
Synonym(s): trophoplast.
2. One of the granules of foreign or differentiated matter in cells: food particles, fat, waste material, chromatophores, and trichocysts.
3. A self-duplicating viruslike particle that multiplies within a host cell (e.g., kappa particles in certain paramecia).
[G. plastos, formed, + -id]

plastid

an organelle of plant cells, with a double membrane. Plastids are large (between 3 and 6 μ m in diameter) and have various roles, e.g. a photosynthetic function (CHLOROPLAST) or a storage function (AMYLOPLAST).

plastid

1. any elementary constructive unit, as a cell.
2. any specialized organ of the cell other than the nucleus and centrosome, such as chloroplast, mitochondria or amyloplast.
References in periodicals archive ?
The mitochondria and plastids in almost all eukaryotes divide after organelle-nuclear division, as in slime mould.
Evolution of the rpoB-psbZ region in fern plastid genomes: notable structural rearrangements and highly variable intergenic spacers.
In conclusion, CA plants overexpressing APX and CuZnSOD in plastids depicted enhanced tolerance against various environmental stresses.
If the QMS arose from P-MTOCs, the spindle poles may slide away from the fixed plastids, the plastids themselves may move, or in one case (Sphagnum) the P-MTOCs remain intact and little or no convergence of poles occurs (Brown & Lemmon, 1993; see section on Sphagnum).
The observations of plastids fusing with vacuoles in the apical cells of the GTs, and the similarity between the contents of the vacuoles and the plastid stroma, strongly suggest a conversion of plastids into vacuoles, as has been reported in other types of secretory cells (Paiva & Machado 2008).
Polypeptide profile of plastids isolated from seedlings grown under different light conditions was studied by SDS-PAGE.
Leucoplasts are nonpigmented plastids but contain enzymes responsible for the synthesis of starch.
These cells are multinucleate, contain small plastids, and abundant endoplasmic reticulum apically positioned.
Gast also continued her investigations of an unnamed microbe that eats algae and removes their photosynthetic plastids (an organelle within the cytoplasm).
Thus, the latter fraction contains the bulk of plant folates, but mitochondria, which represent only a few percent of the cell volume, have the highest concentration, whereas plastids have the lowest (Gambonnet et al.
Previous work in our lab had characterized an abundant nucleoid protein (DCP68) from plastids of cultured soybean cells that is able to compact DNA in vitro.
This energy parasite gene is present only in rickettsiae, chlamydiae, and plant plastids (6).