plaque

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Related to Plaques: Senile plaques, Amyloid plaques

plaque

 [plak]
1. any patch or flat area.
2. a superficial, solid, elevated skin lesion with a diameter equal to or greater than 1.0 cm (0.5 cm according to some authorities); see also papule.
atheromatous plaque fibrous plaque.
dental plaque a dense, nonmineralized, highly organized biofilm of microbes, organic and inorganic material derived from the saliva, gingival crevicular fluid, and bacterial byproducts. It plays an important etiologic role in the development of dental caries and periodontal and gingival diseases; calcified plaque forms dental calculus.
fibrous plaque the lesion of atherosclerosis, a white to yellow area within the wall of an artery that causes the intimal surface to bulge into the lumen; it is composed of lipid, cell debris, smooth muscle cells, collagen, and, in older persons, calcium. Called also atheromatous plaque.
Hollenhorst p's atheromatous emboli containing cholesterol crystals in the retinal arterioles.
pleural p's opaque white plaques on the parietal pleura, visible radiographically in cases of asbestosis.
senile p's microscopic lesions composed of fragmented axon terminals and dendrites surrounding a core of amyloid seen in the cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease.

plaque

(plak),
1. A patch or small differentiated area on a body surface (for example, skin, mucosa, or arterial endothelium) or on the cut surface of an organ such as the brain; in skin, a circumscribed, elevated, superficial, and solid area exceeding 1 cm in diameter.
2. An area of clearing in a flat confluent growth of bacteria or tissue cells, such as that caused by the lytic action of bacteriophage in an agar plate culture of bacteria, by the cytopathic effect of certain animal viruses in a sheet of cultured tissue cells, or by antibody (hemolysin) produced by lymphocytes cultured in the presence of erythrocytes and to which complement has been added.
3. A sharply defined zone of demyelination characteristic of multiple sclerosis.
4.
[Fr. a plate]

plaque

(plăk)
n.
1. A scaly patch on a body part, especially the skin.
2. A biofilm of bacteria in a matrix of polysaccharides and other substances on the surface of a tooth or teeth.
3.
a. A deposit of fatty material on the inner lining of an arterial wall, characteristic of atherosclerosis.
b. The material that such a deposit is composed of.
4. A deposit consisting mainly of beta-amyloid and degenerating nerve tissue, found in the brain tissue of people with Alzheimer's disease.
5. A sharply defined zone of demyelination in the central nervous system characteristic of multiple sclerosis.
6. A clear, often round patch of lysed cells in an otherwise opaque layer of a bacteria or cell culture.

plaque

Cardiology
An early lesion of atherosclerosis which may be found in persons of any age in large vessels.
 
Dentistry
A soft sticky substance on teeth composed of bacteria and saliva; an indurated soft mass of polysaccharides and bacteria—e.g., Lactobacillus acidophilus, Streptococcus mutans.

Dermatology
A flat, solid, elevated, ≥ 1.0-cm-diameter skin nodule formed either by extension or coalescence of papules of lichen amyloidosis, lichen simplex chronicus, lichen planus, or psoriasis; a “plaque” stage occurs in certain skin tumours (e.g., the second stage of Kaposi sarcoma), and evolving mycosis fungoides.
 
Molecular biology
A clear area on a lawn of bacterial cells caused by the lysis of infected cells by a phage.
 
Neuropathology
Shadow plaques—one of multiple, irregularly shaped and sharply demarcated lesions (focal demyelinisation) in the gray and white matter in the brain of patients with multiple sclerosis.

plaque

Cardiology An early lesion of ASHD found in persons of any age in larger vessels Dentistry A soft sticky substance on teeth composed of bacteria and saliva; an indurated gob of polysaccharides and bacteria–eg, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Streptococcus mutans. See Periodontitis Dermatology A flat, solid, elevated ≥ 1. 0 cm in diameter skin nodule formed either by extension or coalescence of papules of lichen amyloidosis, lichen simplex chronicus, lichen planus, psoriasis; a 'plaque' stage occurs in certain skin tumors–eg, the 2nd stages of KS, mycosis fungoides Neurology 'Shadow plaques' Multiple, irregularly shaped, and sharply demarcated lesions–focal demyelinization in the gray and white matter in the brain of Pts with MS. Asymmetric unit membrane plaque, Atherosclerotic plaque, Complicated plaque, Fibrous plaque, Multiple sclerosis, Parietal pleural plaque, Senile plaque, Shadow plaque, Soldier's plaque

plaque

(plak)
1. A patch or small, differentiated area on a body surface (e.g., skin, mucosa, or arterial endothelium) or on the cut surface of an organ such as the brain.
2. An area of clearing in a flat, confluent growth of bacteria or tissue cells.
3. A sharply defined zone of demyelination characteristic of multiple sclerosis.
[Fr. a plate]

plaque

1. An area of ATHEROMA found in the inner lining of arteries in the disease of ATHEROSCLEROSIS.
2. A sticky mixture of food debris, saliva and bacteria that persists around the necks of uncleaned teeth and is the main cause of tooth decay.

plaque

  1. a clear area in a ‘lawn’ of bacterial growth, in which the bacteria have undergone LYSIS due to BACTERIOPHAGE infection. The number of plaque-forming units in a given volume applied to the lawn can be used to calculate viral numbers in a suspension.
  2. a layer that forms on the surface of a tooth, composed of bacteria in an organic matrix (see BIOFILM). As the layer thickens, anaerobic respiration of the bacteria produces acids which dissolve the tooth enamel.

Plaque

Patches of scar tissue that form where the layer of yelin covering the nerve fibers is destroyed by the multiple sclerosis disease process.

plaque

, placque (plak)
2. Patch or small, differentiated area on body surface (e.g., skin, mucosa, or arterial endothelium) or on cut surface of an organ.
3. An area of clearing in a flat, confluent growth of bacteria or tissue cells.
[Fr. a plate]
References in periodicals archive ?
While many will be familiar with the work and philanthropy of the Cadbury family and financial legacy of Lloyd Sampson, the plaques give people the chance to learn more about lesser-known industrialists such as silver-plating developer G.R.
The evaluation of the clinical effect of topical St Johns wort (Hypericum perforatum L.) in plaque type psoriasis vulgaris: A pilot study.
Dental plaque is defined as soft deposits that form a biofilm adhering to the tooth surface, removable and fixed restorations.1 It has long been recognized that the presence of dental plaque leads to gingivitis, periodontitis and is also capable of reducing the pH at the surface of enamel to the levels that can cause dissolution of the hydroxyapatite crystals and initiates caries.2
English Heritage has been conscious of the need to increase the representation of women in the blue plaque scheme but said that only a third of public nominations have been for women since the start of their 'plaques for women' campaign in 2016.
Centella asiatica Demonstrated to Stabilize Existing Plaques
The Knowsley Crest, which appears on the plaques, was a bespoke commission, initially hand-carved in wood by craftsmen, then hand-painted after casting.
The plaque scheme aims to install up to five plaques a year and one will be decided by a public vote.
The meeting was arranged after Johnson publicly called for the removal of the "Children of the Confederacy Creed" plaque, which was erected in 1959 and is located outside his Capitol office.
THE studio where David Bowie recorded some of his best-known albums is to have a blue plaque.
Interactive Effects of Traditional and Novel Risk Factors on Human Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques
We found the age of patients in two subgroups was significantly higher than the non-plaque group, this demonstrates that the formation of atherosclerotic plaques may be closely correlated to the age of patients.