temporal plane

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tem·po·ral plane

[TA]
a slightly depressed area on the side of the cranium, below the inferior temporal line, formed by the temporal and parietal bones, the greater wing of the sphenoid, and a part of the frontal bone.
Synonym(s): planum temporale [TA]

tem·po·ral plane

(tem'pŏr-ăl plān) [TA]
A slightly depressed area on the side of the cranium, below the inferior temporal line, formed by the temporal and parietal bones, the greater wing of the sphenoid, and a part of the frontal bone.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Melodi (beste) ve tekst (gufte)nin senkronize islenmesinde sol posterior planum temporale, senkronize sarki soylemede bilateral inferior pariyetal lobul anterior kismi ve sag posterior planum temporale, senkronize konusmada ise sol anguler girus aktive olmaktadir.
Bir baska calismada sol inferior parietal lob on kismi, sag posterior planum temporale, sag planum polare, sag insula senkronize sarki soylemede senkronize konusma ile karsilastirmada aktive olan alanlar olarak bildirilmistir (6,20).
Unique to the human brain is a region within the planum temporale (itself situated in Wernicke's area, which is a larger locus associated with language comprehension).
In this paper, the evidence about brain abnormalities in different stmctures associated with dyslexia is examined: planum temporale, parietal lobe, corpus callosum, cerebellum, insula and right hemisphere.
Key words: dyslexia, learning disabilities, brain damaged, brain, planum temporale.
In 1968 Geschwind and his then student Walter Levitsky had shown in the general population that the planum temporale, comprising part of the auditory association cortex involved in linguistic functions, was large on the left and small on the right, perhaps explaining language lateralization to the left hemisphere.
Nevertheless, studies on two cerebral structures, the planum temporale and the corpus callosum [2], show how controversial scientific evidence can be accepted as fact when structure and function are conflated.
A new study finds that the common chimpanzee, despite its inability to speak, shares with people one feature of this anatomical pattern--a structure called the planum temporale is larger on the left side of the brain than on the right.
In most people, the planum temporale, which corresponds roughly to Wernicke's area, is larger on the left than on the right (Geschwind & Levitsky, 1968), and Galaburda, Corsiglia, Rosen & Sherman (1987) report evidence that this asymmetry is achieved through the loss or 'pruning' of cells on the right side during growth.
In people who are not dyslexic, however, the left planum temporale was noticeably larger.
It provides a convenient anterior boundary to the planum temporale (PT), a roughly triangular region that has the most robust known lateral asymmetry in the human brain.
Thus the placement of much of this particular area, known as the planum temporale, in the left hemisphere may improve handling of the verbal and musical information that facilitates perfect pitch, Schlaug's group contends.