lectin

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lectin

 [lek´tin]
a term applied to hemagglutinating substances present in saline extracts of certain plant seeds, which specifically agglutinate erythrocytes of certain blood groups or stimulate lymphocyte proliferation.

lec·tin

(lek'tin),
Any of a group of glycoproteins of primarily plant (usually seed) origin that binds to glycoproteins on the surface of cells causing agglutination, precipitation, or other phenomena resembling the action of specific antibody; lectins include plant agglutinins (phytoagglutinins, phytohemagglutinins), plant precipitins, and perhaps certain animal proteins; some have mitogenic properties and induce lymphocyte transformation.
[L. lego, pp. lectum, to select, + -in]

lectin

/lec·tin/ (lek´tin) any of a group of hemagglutinating proteins found primarily in plant seeds, which bind specifically to the branching sugar molecules of glycoproteins and glycolipids on the surface of cells.

lectin

(lĕk′tĭn)
n.
Any of various proteins or glycoproteins that bind to the sugar molecules of glycoproteins and glucolipids on the surfaces of cells and are found in most organisms, especially plants. They are used to stimulate lymphocyte proliferation and to agglutinate red blood cells.

lectin

[lek′tin]
a protein in seeds and other parts of certain plants that binds with glycoproteins and glycolipids on the surface of animal cells, causing agglutination. Some lectins agglutinate erythrocytes in specific blood groups, and others stimulate the production of T lymphocytes.

lec·tin

(lek'tin)
A protein of primarily plant (usually seed) origin that binds to glycoproteins on the surface of cells causing agglutination, precipitation, or other phenomena resembling the action of specific antibody; lectins include plant agglutinins (phytoagglutinins, phytohemagglutinins), plant precipitins, and perhaps some animal proteins; some have mitogenic properties.
[L. lego, pp. lectum, to select, + -in]

lectin

one of a group of proteins that specifically bind or crosslink carbohydrates. Lectins are poisonous compounds often produced in plants and their seeds, for example ricin is produced by beans of the castor plant Ricinus communis, and has the potential to be used as an agent of BIOLOGICAL WARFARE. If present in high amount (more than a few parts per thousand) in the body, lectins can cause blood clotting and interfere with the IMMUNE SYSTEM. Absorbed into the bloodstream they may cause cancer.

lectin

1. hemagglutinating substances present in saline extracts of certain plant seeds, which agglutinate erythrocytes of certain blood groups or stimulate lymphocyte proliferation.
2. antinutritive factors in legume seeds; interfere with protein digestion in monogastric livestock.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Novel role for p73 in the regulation of Akt-Foxola-Bim signaling and apoptosis induced by the plant lectin.
Consistent with these results, it has been suggested that PCL and OJL induce L929 cell apoptosis dependently of caspase because these plant lectins possess some identical or similar sugar-binding activities, which may lead to subsequent activation of caspase.
Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectins, a widely studied plant lectin superfamily with mannose-binding specificity, have been drawn a rising attention in light of numerous investigations concerning the correlation between their carbohydrate-binding and anti-tumor activities (Barre et al.
Such differences in the specificities of plant lectins towards different tumor cell lines have been documented (Kiss et al.
In recent years, several plant lectins have been widely reported to possess markedly inhibitory effect or cytotoxicity and induce apoptosis in a variety of typical tumor cells (De Mejia and Prisecaru 2005).
These results would provide new evidence for further exploring the relationship between tertiary structure and anti-tumor activity of plant lectins.
Plant lectins constitute a heterogeneous group of proteins with different biochemical properties and carbohydrate-binding specificities.
Recently, the major breakthrough in plant lectin research has been achieved with many legume lectins in the study of antineoplastic activity (Orntoft and Vestergaard, 1999).