plant hormone

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Related to Plant hormones: Plant growth regulators

plant hormone

any of several chemical substances produced in very low concentrations in plants, that control growth and development. They are now usually called growth substances. Plant HORMONES are produced in active MERISTEMS (e.g. root and shoot apices) from where they diffuse to other parts of the plant. A distinct contrast with animal hormonal systems is the fact that plants do not possess specific tissues for hormone production, nor a well-defined distribution system equivalent to the blood system.

Plant hormones are classified generally into several groups, discussed under separate headings: ABSCISSIC ACID, AUXINS, CYTOKININS and GIBBERELLINS.

References in periodicals archive ?
Application of appropriate plant hormone concentrations to the base of cuttings is extremely important for asexual propagation via cuttings, and optimal concentrations vary across fruit species (HARTMANN et al., 2011).
Over the past decade, the number of functionally characterized peptide signals has increased several-fold and now exceeds the number of classical plant hormones such as auxin and gibberellin.
Sufficient of nutrient such as phosphate, reduction of fungal disease, and adequate of plant hormones contributed to this result.
Plant hormones such as indole-3 acetic acid, gibberellins, zeatin a cytokinin and abscisic acid were found in high concentration (Table 1).
Plant hormones: physiology biochemistry and molecular biology.
Multiple plant hormones play significant roles in many regulating processes in plants, such as growth and plant responses to stresses [22, 23].
Plant hormones such as auxins can be bought from nurseries and garden stores to help give cuttings a good chance at setting down roots and growing, or help graft one type of plant to another.
Microbial populations also might enhance delivery of water and nutrients to a sorghum plant's roots and trigger them to produce enzymes and plant hormones that influence its growth and yield.
[16] were shown that plant hormones in general and auxins in particular, can significantly affect the uptake and further transport of nutrients within plants by regulating the sink action of developing tissues.
Herbicides are not as much health hazardous as insecticides and pesticides as they hinder the proper functioning of the plant hormones but do not effect on animals directly.
In third-stage dormancy, plant hormones direct a change within cells resulting in the production of antifreeze within cells, ensuring resistance to deep-freeze conditions.