biocoenosis

(redirected from Plant community)
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Related to Plant community: Plant succession

biocoenosis

the COMMUNITY of organisms which occupies a particular BIOTOPE.
References in periodicals archive ?
But changes in climate and intense weather, such as droughts and hurricanes, can cause these plant communities to shift or disappear, resulting in lasting changes to the coastlines they protect.Seeing mangrove loss during the late Holocene, when the climate was cooler and rates of sea-level rise were much lower than today, indicates that in the future, there could be much more stress on this important plant community as the climate continues to warm and rates of sea-level rise accelerate, said Jones.
The authors belive that state is defined as alternative and stable plant community that state does not convert easily.
Plant community data were collected from a total of 21 sites in 2013 and 2014.
Table 3: Plant community structure of the sites in the Kirana Hills in Punjab
Lead author Jessica Whiteside, a geochemist from the University of Southampton, United Kingdom, found that wild climate swings correspond to changes in plant community structure, from a seed fern-dominated system to a conifer-dominated system, and that individual plant groups repeatedly alternated from rare to common through time.
To examine shifts in plant species cover and abundance over the course of the study, we began monitoring plant community composition in June of 2006.
Thawing of permafrost and the resulting changes in surface drainage alter soil conditions for plant growth, while at the same time plant community composition and structure affect permafrost stability through surface cover or effects on snow interception (Kanigan and Kokelj, 2010; Kokelj et al., 2010).
And these differences can be important when rangeland managers are trying to decide whether to remove shrubs as part of grassland restoration, whether the shrubs are elements of the historical plant community, or whether they are now the only plants that can exist in a site."
Three new chapters have been added to this second edition of a text on vegetation ecology (also known as plant community ecology) for advanced students and researchers in plant ecology, geography, forestry, and nature conservation.
In the two sites surveyed in this study (ranches El Herradero and San Jose de los Leones) Tamaulipean thorn scrub is the main plant community type, making this an important area for conservation and management.
Specifically we present an brief summary of the studies of 1) the main environmental gradients relating to plant community composition (GUTIERREZ-GIRON & GAVILAN, 2013), 2) the functional composition of plant communities and its relationships with the environmental factors (GUTIERREZ-GIRON & GAVILAN, 2013) and 3) the spatial pattern and species association in high mountain communities in Sistema Central (GUTIERREZ-GIRON & GAVILAN, 2010).
The effective methods for measuring functional diversity in plant community are essential in the studies of functional diversity [6].