atmosphere

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atmosphere

 [at´mos-fēr]
1. the entire gaseous envelope surrounding the earth and subject to the earth's gravitational field.
2. the air or climate in a particular place. adj., atmospher´ic.
3. a unit of pressure, being that exerted by the earth's atmosphere at sea level; equal to 1.01325 × 105pascals (approximately 760 mm Hg). Abbreviated atm.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

at·mos·phere

(at'mŏs-fēr),
1. Any gas surrounding a given body; a gaseous medium.
See also: standard atmosphere, torr.
2. A unit of air pressure equal to 101.325 kPa.
See also: standard atmosphere, torr.
[atmo- + G. sphaira, sphere]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

at·mos·phere

(at'mŏs-fēr)
1. Any gas surrounding a given body; a gaseous medium.
2. A unit of air pressure equal to 101.325 kPa.
See also: standard atmosphere
[atmo- + G. sphaira, sphere]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

atmosphere

the gaseous envelope surrounding a particular body such as the earth, or the gaseous content of a given structure or container.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Atmosphere

A measurement of pressure. One atmosphere equals the pressure of air at sea level (14.7 pounds per square inch [psi]).
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
He emphasizes, however, that this method of studying planetary atmospheres works only if a planet passes directly in front of its star as seen from Earth.
Using near-infrared spectra of the planets observed with Hubble, Madhusudhan and his collaborators estimated the amount of water vapor in each of the planetary atmospheres that explains the data.
It was originally published in French in 1995 by two well-regarded astronomers at France's Meudon Observatory: Jacques Crovisier, who specializes in radio and infrared observations of comets, and his colleague Therese Encrenaz, who is involved in remote sensing of planetary atmospheres.
The relatively high concentration of krypton and xenon detected by the spectrometer may thus attest to the importance of comets in determining the chemical evolution of planetary atmospheres.
Current instruments are incapable of providing the kind of information necessary to study planetary atmospheres in detail.
"We think this huge thunderstorm is driving these cloud particles upward, sort of like a volcano bringing up material from the depths and making it visible from outside the atmosphere," explains Sromovsky, a senior scientist at UW-Madison and an expert on planetary atmospheres. "The upper haze is so optically pretty thick that it is only in the stormy regions where the haze is penetrated by powerful updrafts that you can see evidence for the ammonia ice and the water ice.
He analyzes lunar occultation observations for William Hubbard, as well as tenuous planetary atmospheres (Mars, Mercury, and even the Moon) for Donald Hunten.
The impending crash of a wayward comet into distant Jupiter has brought new attention to these and other issues that arise in attempts to understand the perplexing behavior of planetary atmospheres -- at home and abroad.