Eutheria

(redirected from Placental mammals)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Eu·the·ri·a

(yū-thē'rē-ă),
A subclass of mammals, excluding monotremes and marsupials, having a placenta through which the young are nourished.
[eu- + G. thērion, animal]

Eutheria

(ū-thēr′ē-ă)
A subclass of mammals with a true placenta.
References in periodicals archive ?
He added that if dinosaurs had not died out, then placental mammals may not have had the opportunity to diversify the way they did, and our own species would not have evolved.
The evolutionary history of placental mammals has been interpreted in very different ways depending on the data analyzed.
of Athens) present a long-awaited, state-of-the-art reference book about fossil insular placental mammals worldwide.
But unlike marsupials, a placental mammal spends a long time developing inside its mother's body.
They concluded that placental mammals, which make up the vast majority of modern mammals, underwent an explosion of diversity at around the time the dinosaurs died out.
In placental mammals, the claustrum may thus contribute to consciousness without being essential for it.
The possibility that placental mammals once inhabited this land is also supported by fossil and DNA evidence of interchange between mammals of South America and Australia when the continents were connected via Antarctica.
Although the enzyme has previously been isolated in all groups of all phyla except placental mammals, little work has been done with fungi and fewer studies have been done using Chaetomium globosum, a species with high UV damage resistance.
The fauna includes an impressive array of exotics--koalas, kangaroos, duck-billed platipi, wallabies--but no placental mammals or high-level predators.
to survive, just as placental mammals wiped out competing marsupials in the Americas (an idea from robotics researcher Hans Moravec).
Scientists theorize that when Australia broke away from the early supercontinent, Gondwana, millions of years ago, placental mammals had not yet migrated there.
in the history of the placental mammals, although a number of orders have established themselves successfully as herbivores, the predators all belong to a single order, the Carnivora.