toponymy

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to·pon·y·my

(tō-pon'i-mē),
Topical or regional nomenclature, as distinguished from organonymy.
[topo- + G. onyma, name]

toponymy

(tə-pŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. topony·mies
1.
a. The place names of a region or language.
b. The study of such place names.
2. Anatomy Nomenclature with respect to a region of the body rather than to organs or structures.

to·pon′·y·mist (-mĭst) n.

toponymy

(tō-pŏn′ĭ-mē) [″ + onoma, name]
Nomenclature of the regions of the body.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Robinson's Pilgrimage combines narrative accounts of walking across physical space with stories and histories about these particular places and the evolution of placenames. However, unlike later work, a theme of representation, and the anxiety of this representation permeates Stones of Aran.
Further, the ministry pointed out that, according to both the UN and UNESCO, placenames are part of a nation's cultural heritage.
Establishing placenames, which include parish and county names, requires that cataloguers verify each placename--both in spelling and the geospatial coordinates--in Australia's official gazetteer, 'Geoscience Australia's Place Names' (www.ga.gov.au/map/names).
Only placenames such as Warwick, Gloucester and Worcester give the game away.
Eli Johanne Ellingsve (a placenames researcher and adviser to the Norwegian Language Council provides an historical overview of Norway's lighthouses beginning with the first one established some 350 years ago.
I'd had hopes of trying my learner-Welsh on native Breton speakers, to see how much of these very similar languages would be understood, but although the language is on road signs and public notices, and there are obviously-Celtic placenames everywhere, all we heard - and spoke to the locals - was French.
The move was made under the Placenames Order of the Official Languages Act introduced by Gaeltacht Minister Eamon O Cuiv.
Later Dutch navigators gave placenames to the Australian coast, including Van Diemen's Land and later Tasmania.
The authors are interested in origins, because of their lexicographers' love of the meaning of placenames, but most of the information is geared to what people in the contemporary world are expected to want to know.
Type in your postcode at places.jump-around.com/closest (no www in this one), and it will find rude and amusing placenames within 30 miles of where you live AND give you a map showing how to get there.
As a gratuitous bonus then we have an Index Nominum button, which brings us to a very long concordance of names (personal names, placenames and other names), in effect a database of Irish names occurring in the 700+ texts--again typing a name will bring you down the list to where you want to go.
A request has come in for any information about the slang placenames North Cackylacky and South Cackylacky, used for North and South Carolina.