toponymy

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to·pon·y·my

(tō-pon'i-mē),
Topical or regional nomenclature, as distinguished from organonymy.
[topo- + G. onyma, name]

toponymy

(tə-pŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. topony·mies
1.
a. The place names of a region or language.
b. The study of such place names.
2. Anatomy Nomenclature with respect to a region of the body rather than to organs or structures.

to·pon′·y·mist (-mĭst) n.

toponymy

(tō-pŏn′ĭ-mē) [″ + onoma, name]
Nomenclature of the regions of the body.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The database of place-names held by the Latvian Language Institute, University of Latvia, has eight entries for Uomuli, of which six were noted in the vicinity of Ergeme: Uomulu [civil parish], Uomule (river), Uomula (river), Uomulupe (river), Uomulupe (river), Uomulu dzirnavu ezers (millpond).
Even if you have no interest in translations, you may still find yourself interested in some of Nagel's comments on what Tolkien mainly intended to signify with the place-names.
The final part puts place-names in a linguistic as well as historical context, noting how they evolved after the end of the Roman occupation, with English towns and cities also used as examples.
I suspect that there are some NATE readers of this article who are already thinking: 'No isogrammatic place-name in Britain longer than 14 letters?
He does not discuss, except briefly in this chapter, whether fashions in Celtic place-names changed over rime.
One of the leaders of the project, Professor Stephen Harding, from Nottingham University said: "The intensity and distribution of minor place-name elements attests to the persistence of a Scandinavian dialect through the centuries that may reflect the intensity of the original settlement".
Both documents have proven extremely useful for the historical dialectologist in recent times and, in spite of the methodological differences in the treatment of the place-names recorded in each one of them, I would like to focus on their complementary character as informants of processes of linguistic change in early Middle English.
Mills's dictionary is an important addition to English place-name literature.
The group of geographical and historical experts from around Wales who form the new society say Welsh place names are particularly important, as they tend to be descriptive of the conditions at the time of naming, whereas English place-names are subject to obscure influences from Latin, German, French and Scandinavian languages.
Here he compiles elements of place-names that he has spent much time looking up in atlases, dictionaries, and gazetteers; along with their meaning, the language they come from, and often an example of their use in an actual name.
and Eire that share place-names as well as terms that use a place name in their title such as 'Manchester School' or 'Eccles cake'.
The book is structured as 15 short chapters; although the last four are lists of place-names being appendices with brief introductions.