toponymy

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to·pon·y·my

(tō-pon'i-mē),
Topical or regional nomenclature, as distinguished from organonymy.
[topo- + G. onyma, name]

toponymy

(tə-pŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. topony·mies
1.
a. The place names of a region or language.
b. The study of such place names.
2. Anatomy Nomenclature with respect to a region of the body rather than to organs or structures.

to·pon′·y·mist (-mĭst) n.

toponymy

(tō-pŏn′ĭ-mē) [″ + onoma, name]
Nomenclature of the regions of the body.
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References in periodicals archive ?
1977, The Nature of Soviet Place-Names.--Names 25 (1), 15-24.
Richard saw a need for his book because, while there are many local and specialist books on the subject of place-names in Glamorgan, no-one had attempted to draw all of this research together and to revise it.
| Place-Names of Glamorgan by Richard Morgan is published by Welsh Academic Press, priced PS19.99.
In our case, we have yet to seriously examine our place-name system, including our rampant whimsical practice of changing historic names of streets and structures and putting in their stead names of local politicians.
It is a name that evokes to some the dogged fieldworker who, as head of the Scottish Place-Name Survey, travelled around the country interviewing individuals about local toponyms; for many it evokes the pioneering folklorist who was the first and only person to be president of both the American Folklore Society and the Folklore Society; still others see in its onomastic content the educator and university administrator whose sixty-year transatlantic career inspired three generations of new scholars and brought him from Germany to Scotland, Ireland, the United States, and Denmark.
One desideratum I have is that the next edition should include a full index of the place-names mentioned, in addition to the helpful general index.
In the following sub-section, Nagel discusses "Principles of Place-name Giving" starting with actual English place names; he then moves on to argue that Tolkien followed real patterns in his place-names.
Gaerwen is near Llanfairpwll, the short version of the 58-letter name which is the longest place-name in Britain.
Surnames derived from local place-names were also included.
This book is highly recommended, not only for the pleasure of reading about our place-names, but as a handy reference for years to come.
Within the last hundred years, many individual studies of English place-names, and the ongoing work of the English Place-Name Survey, have succeeded in establishing the toponymic corpus of England as a valuable resource for the early history of the English language.
He then covers place-names by latitude, ranging from northern Europe to the less-obvious in Africa and Asia.