Pinocchio effect

Pinocchio effect

A popular term for the observation that the telling of lies results in changes in temperature around the nose, which is attributed to activity of the insula (in the brain). Truthful responses are said to increase activity of the insula and reduce the nose’s temperature; lying decreases insula activity and raises the nose temperature, which is detected by thermography.

First reported by workers at the University of Granada (Spain) in December 2012, the effect, if confirmed, has profound implications for law enforcement as it would provide tool far superior to that of polygraphs, which are effective in detecting lies in about 53% of cases (i.e., only slightly better than a coin toss). The effect was named after Pinocchio, of childrens’ story fame, whose nose grew every time he told a lie.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scientists at the University of Granada investigated the so-called 'Pinocchio effect'.
It turns out that there is something called the Pinocchio Effect -- blood flow increases to our noses when we tell porky-pies.
They have called it "The Pinocchio Effect," in honour of the 19th century Italian tale of the wooden puppet whose nose grew when he failed to tell the truth.
As well as working for Sky, she has been involved with the BBC's Spooks series and feature film The Pinocchio Effect.
The Pinocchio Effect: On Making Italians, 1860-1920.
Il volume di Suzanne Stewart-Steinberg The Pinocchio Effect: On Making Italians, 1860-1920 rappresenta un'ulteriore conferma della rilevanza non puramente letteraria dei problemi posti dalla politica educativa nell'Italia postrisorgimentale.
When you lie, chemicals are released causing tissue inside the nose to swell in a Pinocchio effect. Increased blood pressure causes nerve endings to tingle, which may be why the person opposite you is rubbing his or her nose.
He left KUGN in 1997 to write a book, "The Pinocchio Effect," and to pursue business opportunities.
"The Pinocchio effect" is just one example of prevarication picked up in the testimony by Dr.
American scientists reported this year that a liar's nose really does get bigger, something they call the Pinocchio effect. The theory is that when we lie, the heart pumps more quickly, swelling the nasal tissue and making it itchy.
Among the ruses that children often use to conceal their lying are rubbing their nose (The Pinocchio Effect), covering their mouth and blaming someone else.