Pimelea


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Pimelea

Australian genus of poisonous annual herbs and perennial shrubs in the family Thymelaeaceae; cause two major syndromes: (1) generalized edema, called also St. George or Moree disease, caused in cattle only by a diterpenoid ester, simplexin; the syndrome is one of chronic, right-sided heart failure leading to hydrothorax, massive anasarca and jugular vein distention plus profound anemia and persistent diarrhea; (2) in species other than cattle the only sign is severe diarrhea and a fatal outcome caused by dihydroxycoumarin glycosides; toxic species include P. decora (Flinders poppy), P. elongata, P. flava, P. glauca, P. haematostachya (pimelea or red poppy), P. latifolia (P. altior), P. linifolia, P. microcephala, P. neo-anglica, P. pauciflora, P. prostrata (Strathmore weed), P. simplex, P. trichostachya. Called also many common names, mostly some variation on riceflower, flaxweed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The flowers of a number of Thymelaeaceae are monosymmetric by reduction: some Pimelea species have a single stamen, in other genera the gynoecium is pseudomonomerous (Eckardt, 1937; Herber, 2003).
Physalis minima * * Pimelea microcephala * * Piper novae-hollandiae * Planchonella australis * Podocarpus elatus * Polyalthia nitidissima * Polyscias sambucifolia * * Psychotria simmondsiana * Randia sp.
Intervascular pit pairs in woods of Gnidia caffra, Dirca palustris, and two species of Pimelea were observed with both light and scanning electron microscopy.
and two species of Pimelea with emphases on the presence or absence of a torus, the outline of the pit apertures, and presence or absence of vestures.
Daphne, Dirca, and Pimelea have tracheids as well as vessel members; Gnidia has only the latter.
Species of Gnidia and Pimelea used in this study have irregularities known as vestures along the rims of their pit apertures (Figs.
The more distantly related genera, Drapetes, Gnidia, and Pimelea (different tribe, same subfamily) also have no tori.
cuneata Scrophulariaceae Parentucellia latifolia x Solanaceae Nicotiana suaveolens Solanum ferocissimum Stackhousiaceae Stackhousia monogyna x x x Sterculiaceae Brachychiton populneus x Thymelaeaceae Pimelea linifolia x Urticariaceae Parietaria debilis x x Urtica urens x x Violaceae Hybanthus monopetalus Cryptogams Mosses Acaulon integrifolium x x Barbula calycina x x x x Bryum argentium x Campylopus clavatus x x Campylopus introflexus x x Ceratodon purpurescens x x x x Didymodon torquatus x x x Eccremidium arcuatum x x x x Eccremidium pulchellum x x x Entosthodon apophysatus x x x Entosthodon subnudus subsp.
However, the WTP also supports a significant population of the nationally Vulnerable Growling Grass Frog Litoria raniformis; a number of threatened species of plant, including the Spiny Rice-flower Pimelea spinescens subsp.
Species of particular significance in terms of known populations on Trust for Nature land include Chariot Wheels Maireana cheelii (Vv), Concave Pomaderris Pomaderris subplicata (Vv), Euroa Guinea-flower Hibbertia humifusa erigens (Vv), Leafy Greenhood Pterostylis cucullata (Ve), Little Pink Spider-orchid Caladenia rosella (Ee), Matted Flax-lily Dianella amoena (Ee), Spiny Rice-flower Pimelea spinibractea spinibractea (Ce), Dwarf Kerrawang Rulingia prostrata (Ee) and Swamp Sheoak Casuarina obesa (e).
In this current study it was noted that the generally brownish colouration of Lipotriches flavoviridis (species group) (Halictidae) bees blended effectively with the brownish stems of the scorched Pimelea linifolia and Zieria smithii skeletons that some of these bees roosted upon in recently burnt bushland in 2003.
Leioproctus thornleighensis Kunzea ambigua (L) Leioproctus thornleighensis Kunzea ambigua (L) and Grevillea sericea (L) Megachilidae Megachile ferox Pimelea linifolia (D) Megachile leucopyga * grass leaf (D)--weedy area Megachile sp.