pilocytic astrocytoma


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Related to pilocytic astrocytoma: medulloblastoma

pilocytic as·tro·cy·to·ma

a slowly growing astrocytoma composed histologically of elongated astrocytes; often located in the optic chiasm region of the third ventricle, hypothalamus, or cerebellum, predominantly in younger people.
Synonym(s): piloid astrocytoma
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pi·lo·cyt·ic as·tro·cy·to·ma

(pī'lō-sit'ik as'trō-sī-tō'mă)
A slowly growing astrocytoma composed histologically of elongated astrocytes; often located in the optic chiasm region of the third ventricle, hypothalamus, or cerebellum, predominantly in younger individuals.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

pilocytic astrocytoma

A low-grade (relatively slow growing) tumor made of supporting cells of the brain. It usually found in the cerebellum of children, in whom it causes symptoms of headache, nausea, vomiting, and difficulty with balance.
See also: astrocytoma
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Low rates of recurrence and slow progression of pediatric pilocytic astrocytoma after gross-total resection: justification for reducing surveillance imaging.
Roy, "Primary orbital cystic pilocytic astrocytoma," Ocular Oncology and Pathology, vol.
Zagzag et al., "Activation of mTORC1/mTORC2 signaling in pediatric low-grade glioma and pilocytic astrocytoma reveals mtor as a therapeutic target," Neuro-Oncology, vol.
WHO grade I lesions, which include pilocytic astrocytomas and gangliogliomas, while WHO grade II gliomas are well circumscribed and non-infiltrative.
The most common histological subtype is pilocytic astrocytoma (WHO grade I) followed by fibrillary astrocytoma (WHO grade II).
Lewis was just 20 months old when he was diagnosed with juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma – a rare, benign and slow–growing childhood brain tumour.
In this article, we present two patients (one male adolescent and one female young adult) who were diagnosed with pilocytic astrocytoma and developed cerebellar mutism after posterior fossa surgery.
We have treated cases including Glomus Jugulare, pituitary micro and macro adenomas, acoustic neuroma, schwanoma, Meningioma, metastasis, arteriovenous malformation, brain stem Glioma and recurrent GBM, Cavernous neuroma, pilocytic astrocytoma giant cell tumor etc.
Tumors or cysts treated include a pineal cyst, lateral ventricle arachnoid cysts (n = 3), a large colloid cyst, a benign mixed astroglial cyst, low-grade gliomas (n = 4) (1 myxopapillary ependymoma, 1 WHO grade II astrocytoma, 1 pilocytic astrocytoma, and 1 subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA)), a dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial-like tumor (DNET), an epidermoid tumor, an immature teratoma, a craniopharyngioma, a giant pituitary macroadenoma with intraventricular extension, and a pineal parenchymal tumor (intermediate differentiation).
They are also developing animal models of sporadic pilocytic astrocytoma for drug discovery and testing.