Pilgrim Plant

Pilgrim Plant

A Massachusetts nuclear power station, from which “soft” epidemiologic data suggest a slight increase in leukaemia in those exposed to low levels (i.e., < 500 mrems/year) of radiation.
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As well, the Pilgrim plant in Massachusetts recently announced it is to be closing and is estimated to have 3,000 radioactive rods in storage that will be stored on-site indefinitely.
And with a cranberry Pilgrim plant, you can go one better and make your own.
said the Pilgrim plant is only designed to deal with a four- to eight-hour power outage and noted extended power outages can result from hurricanes, floods or terrorism.
Or take the example of the Pilgrim plant in Massachusetts.
Of the $1 billion the company's customers are paying for all of Boston Edison's "stranded costs," over $500 million is from the Pilgrim plant alone.
Like Oyster Creek, the Pilgrim plant wasn't supposed to be a prime candidate for acquisition; it was just too expensive to operate.
The Pilgrim plant in Massachusetts was sold in 1999 for $80 million, of which $67 million was for fuel.
The team also is responsible for license renewal at all Entergy plants and currently is preparing applications for the Pilgrim plant in Plymouth, MA, and Arkansas Nuclear One unit 2, Russellville, AR.
Most of the nation's 104 commercial reactors - including the 685-megawatt Pilgrim plant in Plymouth, the state's only commercial nuclear power plant - are owned and operated by private energy companies or consortiums that have the technical expertise to do the job and the financial wherewithal to cover the huge upfront costs for siting, licensing and constructing such facilities.
In addition, Entergy has proven its ability to complete a nuclear transaction, having acquired the Pilgrim plant from Boston Edison last year in the first purchase of an operating nuclear plant in the nation.