Pidgin

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Related to Pigeon English: Pidgin English
A language that is no one’s native language, but is used as an auxiliary or supplemental language between 2 or more mutually unintelligible speech communities
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PAPERBACKS 1 Pure, Andrew Miller 2 Before I Go To Sleep, S J Watson 3 Call The Midwife, Jennifer Worth 4 War Horse, Michael Morpurgo 5 Birdsong, Sebastian Faulks 6 My Dear I Wanted To Tell You, Louisa Young 7 War Horse: Movie Tie-in, Michael Morpurgo 8 Pigeon English, Stephen Kelman 9 Birdsong: TV Series Tie-in, Sebastian Faulks 10 Daughters-In-Law, Joanna Trollope HARDBACKS 1 Diary Of A Wimpy Kid: Cabin Fever, Jeff Kinney 2 Gangsta Granny, David Walliams 3 French Children Don't Throw Food, Pamela Druckerman 4 The Etymologicon, Mark Forsyth 5 The Promise, Lesley Pearse 6 Private Games, James Patterson 7 The Usborne Children's Picture Atlas, Ruth Brocklehurst 8 Bradshaw's Handbook, George Bradshaw 9 The Sense Of An Ending, Julian Barnes 10 Birthdays For The Dead, Stuart MacBride
Alongside McGuinness, there are three other first-time novelists, one of which is Stephen Kelman, whose debut novel, Pigeon English, draws on the murder of 10-year-old Damilola Taylor.
8/10 * Pigeon English, by Stephen Kelman, is published as a trade paperback by Bloomsbury, priced pounds 12.99.
Perhaps it took the piecemeal, pigeon English of a foreign coach to cut to the chase.
As well as Barnes and Hollingshurt, the nominees include Sebastian Barry for On Canaan's Side, Carol Birch's work Jamrach's Menagerie, Patrick deWitt for The Sisters Brothers, Esi Edugyan for Half Blood Blues, Yvvette Edwards' novel A Cupboard Full Of Coats, and Stephen Kelman for Pigeon English.
Swans boss Paulo Sousa is still to see one of his attackers net in five opening Championship matches and in pigeon English the ex-QPR chief explained: "In Portugal we drive on the right.
Not infrequently, the result is gibberish, or pigeon English.