curie

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curie

 (Ci) [ku´re]
a unit of radioactivity, defined as the quantity of any radioactive nuclide in which the number of disintegrations per second is 3.700 × 1010.

Curie

Marie (1867-193) and Pierre (1859-1906), French chemists and physicists and Nobel laureates (wife and husband). See: curium.

cu·rie (C, c, Ci),

(kyū'rē),
A unit of measurement of radioactivity, 3.70 ×1010 disintegrations per second; formerly defined as the radioactivity of the amount of radon in equilibrium with 1 g radium; superseded by the S.I. unit, the becquerel (1 disintegration per second).
[Marie (1867-1934) and Pierre (1859-1906) Curie, French chemists and physicists and Nobel laureates]

curie

/cu·rie/ (Ci) (ku´re) a unit of radioactivity, defined as the quantity of any radioactive nuclide in which the number of disintegrations per second is 3.700 × 1010.

curie (Ci)

[kyoo͡r′ē]
Etymology: Marie Skladowska Curie, Polish-born chemist and physicist, 1867-1934; Pierre Curie, French chemist and physicist, 1859-1906; both Nobel laureates
a unit of radioactivity used before adoption of the becquerel (Bq) as the SI unit. It is equal to 3.70 × 1010 Bq.

curie

An obsolete unit of radioactivity (i.e., radioactive decay) equal to 3.7 x 1010 disintegrations/sec of a radioactive nuclide, roughly equivalent to the activity of 1 g of radium; the curie was replaced by the SI-derived unit for radioactivity, the Becquerel (2.70 x 10-11 curies).

cu·rie

(Ci) (kyūr'ē)
A unit of measurement of radioactivity, 3.70 × 1010 disintegrations per second; superseded by the S.I. unit, the becquerel (1 disintegration per second).

Curie,

Marie, French physicist, 1867-1934.
curie - a unit of measurement of radioactivity.

Curie,

Pierre, French physicist, 1859-1906.
curie - a unit of measurement of radioactivity.

cu·rie

(C) (kyūr'ē)
A unit of measurement of radioactivity superseded by the S.I. unit, the becquerel (1 disintegration per second).

curie (kyŏŏ´rē),

a measurement of radioactivity produced by the disintegration of unstable elements. The curie is that quantity of a radioactive nuclide in which the number of disintegrations per second is 3.700 times 1010. Because the curie is a relatively large unit, the millicurie (0.00 curie) and the microcurie (one-millionth of a curie) are more often used. The curie is based on the number of nuclear disintegrations and not on the number or amount of radiations emitted.

curie

a non-SI unit of radioactivity, defined as the quantity of any radioactive nuclide in which the number of disintegrations per second is 3.7 × 1010; abbreviated Ci. Now replaced by the becquerel.
References in periodicals archive ?
He estimated that close to 39 percent of Central Massachusetts homes have radon levels over 4 picocuries per liter.
He explained that the latest concensus is that 1 out of 100 nonsmokers would get lung cancer from a lifetime (60 to 70 percent of his time) in a house that had 4 picocuries per liter of radon present.
The amount: In January 1996, a basement storage room at City View had 1,981 picocuries of radon per liter of air, hundreds of times higher than the acceptable level of less than 4 picocuries.
In August, consultants drilled two wells near the tritium hit and found tritium at 80,000 and 16,000 picocuries per liter, respectively.
In 234 of the 250 well-water samples they detected radon levels exceeding 2,500 picocuries per liter.
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set an "action" limit for radon exposure at 4 picocuries per liter of air (pCi/L), but also emphasizes that any level of radon exposure carries some risk (www.
Groundwater samples taken in March show tritium at 80,000 picocuries per liter, or four times the national drinking water limit.
With the exception of some very low California readings, all measurements of ash with fallout-cesium exceeded - some by 100 times or more - the levels of radioactive cesium that may be released from nuclear plants (about 100 picocuries per kilogram of sludge).
Water softening technology is well suited to reduce radium to "almost non-detectable levels" - below the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of five or less picocuries per liter (pCi/L) - as established by EPA compliance guidelines.
Yet, I have not tested my Austin home for radon because Travis County has an average predicted indoor radon concentration of less than two picocuries per liter.