corporal punishment

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corporal punishment

Public health The use of physical punishment–beating or other form of bodily injury to discipline children and control misbehavior. See Domestic violence. Cf Capital punishment.
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5 years, 32 more countries have enacted legislation to prohibit all physical punishment and another 45 are committed to follow suit.
with abused young people, said any physical punishment of children by a parent or someone in a more powerful position was unacceptable.
As adoptive parents in the state of Illinois, my husband and I were required to promise not to use corporal punishment as part of the paperwork that determined our ability to adopt, and physical punishment is banned in foster care in all 50 states.
Physical punishment is a social evil related to teaching that appears to be a major cause of the lack of education in a country like mine, i.
The finding "adds to our existing worries about the use of physical punishment, and speaks to the value of non-physical discipline," Berlin , who wasn't involved in the new study, told.
A long-debated topic in recent years has been the use of physical punishment as a means of disciplining children.
They found about six per cent of interview subjects had been punished beyond spanking "sometimes," "fairly often" or "very often" - and those people with a history of harsh physical punishment were more likely to have a range of mood and personality disorders or to abuse drugs and alcohol.
That figure may seem low, particularly since about half of the US population recalls being spanked in childhood, but nevertheless shows that physical punishment can raise the risk of problems later on, experts said.
But, Tom Scott of Stopp, the Society of Teachers Opposed to Physical Punishment, welcomed the ruling.
Washington, Feb 7 ( ANI ): Physical punishment of children is potentially harmful to their long-term development, researchers have warned.
A review in 2007 by the Department for Children, Schools and Families found around half of parents didn't like using physical punishment - but that they were prepared to do so if nothing else worked.
Gwenda Thomas, the deputy minister for social services, insisted the Welsh Government was committed to stopping the physical punishment of children - but said legislation should not be undertaken lightly.