interaction

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interaction

 [in″ter-ak´shun]
1. the quality, state, or process of (two or more things) acting on each other.
2. reciprocal actions or influences among people, such as mother-child, husband-wife, client-nurse, or parent-teacher.
drug interaction see drug interaction.
impaired social interaction a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual participates in either an insufficient or an excessive quantity of social exchange, or with an ineffective quality of social exchange. See also social isolation.

in·ter·ac·tion

(in'tĕr-ak'shŭn),
1. The reciprocal action between two entities in a common environment as in chemical interaction, ecologic interaction, and social interaction.
2. The effects when two entities concur that would not be observed with either in isolation.
3. In statistics, pharmacology, and quantitative genetics, the phenomenon that the combined effects of two causes differ from the sum of the effects separately (as in synergism and antagonism).
4. Independent operation of two or more causes to produce or prevent an effect.
5. In statistics, the necessity for a product term in a linear model.
6. The transfer of energy between elementary particles or between fields of energy.

interaction

/in·ter·ac·tion/ (in″ter-ak´shun) the quality, state, or process of (two or more things) acting on each other.
drug interaction  the action of one drug upon the effectiveness or toxicity of another (or others).

interaction

A clinical trial term of art for a situation in which a treatment contrast—e.g., difference between investigational product and control—is dependent on a factor external to the effect (or lack thereof) of the treatment (e.g., the centre where the trial is being carried out).

A quantitative interaction refers to the case where the magnitude of the contrast differs at different levels of the factor; for a qualitative interaction, the direction of the contrast differs for at least one level of the factor.

interaction

Vox populi The reciprocal activities of 2 or more entities in a shared environment. See Adhesive interaction, Drug interaction, Hydrophobic interaction, Integrin-mediated adhesive interaction, Paracrine interaction, Social interaction, Statistical interaction, VA interaction.

in·ter·ac·tion

(in'tĕr-ak'shŭn)
1. The reciprocal action between two entities in a common environment, as in chemical, ecologic, and social interaction.
2. The effects when two entities concur that would not be observed with either in isolation.
3. statistics, pharmacology, quantitative genetics The phenomenon that the combined effects of two causes differ from the sum of the effects separately (as in synergism and antagonism).
4. Independent operation of two or more causes to produce or prevent an effect.
5. statistics The necessity for a product term in a linear model.

interaction,

n in traditional Chinese medicine, the restricting nature of the five elements (wood, fire, earth, metal, and water), which is considered to be a normal activity.

in·ter·ac·tion

(in'tĕr-ak'shŭn)
1. The reciprocal action between two entities in a common environment as in chemical interaction, ecologic interaction, and social interaction.
2. The effects when two entities concur that would not be observed with either in isolation.

interaction,

n according to Newton's law of interaction, the phenomenon in which every force is accompanied by an equal and opposite force. For every force there are two bodies–one to exert the force and one to receive it. Furthermore, whenever there is one force, another force must also be involved. If there is force to the right on one body, there is force to the left on another. Because the one force acts as long as the other, the impulses are equal. The total momentum of the two interacting bodies cannot change. Continuous interaction is demonstrated between the food that is masticated and the force applied to the food.

interaction

1. the quality, state or process of (two or more things) acting on each other.
2. in statistical terms, the response to one factor at any particular level, which differs according to the level of the other factor.
3. see effect modifier.

drug interaction
the action of one drug upon the effectiveness or toxicity of another (or others).

Patient discussion about interaction

Q. Is there any possibility for drug interactions when bipolar drugs and herbal drugs are taken together. My mom is on lithium. Recently she tried some herbal treatment as it’s said to have no side effects. Is there any possibility for drug interactions when bipolar drugs and herbal drugs are taken together.

A. my recommedation is to talk to your physician before taking any OTC medication or herbal meds.

Q. Can certain fruits/veggies make Ritalin less effective? I've heard this about oranges and lemons - is it true? How about other produce? How much does it weaken Ritalin? Will taking a higher dose resolve the problem? (I currently take 10mg morning and 10mg afternoon)

A. As far as I know, oranges and lemons don't affect Ritalin. However, taking the Ritalin with food may increase the amount of drug that actually get into your body, but it depends on the specific formulation (e.g. Concerta isn't affected by food). One that takes Ritalin should avoid alcoholic drinks, since it may cause decrease activity of the brain, and also should avoid herbs of several kinds (yohimbine and ephedra).

THIS IS ONLY A GENERAL ADVICE - I haven't seen you or checked you, so if you have any concerns than you should consult a doctor.

More discussions about interaction
References in periodicals archive ?
Direct physical interaction using haptic technologies will be combined with perception enhancement using cognitive science programming paradigms to drive the exoskeleton.
Chairman SECP Zafar ul Haq Hijazi said that the SECP was imparting knowledge through digital means - web portal- SMS and social media - and physical interaction via seminars and workshops.
The precise control of this movement relies on the direct physical interaction between a calcium channel protein ryanodine receptor (RYR), and a calcium-sensing protein called calmodulin.
Consumers in O2O environments gain more efficient services, improved access to goods, and enhanced online shopping experiences, as well as innovative opportunities to get customizable goods, personalized services, and 24/7 service from industries that traditionally relied on physical interaction.
e pilot programme, which took place at the theme park, saw the group of 18-23 year olds, including some long-term unemployed, receive training, including rst aid and conict management, physical interaction and customer service skills, to enable them to apply for the Security Industry Authority (SIA) licence for door supervision.
Asked if a nose-to-nose greeting is riskier than a handshake, Dr Malek said any kind of physical interaction with an infected patient could allow for the transmission of the virus.
Finally, the iPhone 6 is a killer device if users can manipulate it by physical interaction or gestures even from a distance.
There is something decidedly low-key and backward-looking about these new works--the events of the past redrawn and rearranged, the sculptures that no longer require physical interaction on the part of the viewer--a feeling of an older artist settling down into his place in art history.
Scientists from Imperial College London and two Japanese institutions explored whether physical interaction improved the way people performed in a computer-based task where they were using a joystick-like device.
Those patients with flu should avoid physical interaction with people, and patients must wash their hands frequently," Ceyhan advised.
There was definitely a lot of physical interaction.
The physical interaction can add a tactile learning experience to the story, which is also fun, and helps to engage the child with the parent in the story.