louse

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louse

 [lows] (pl. lice)
any of various grayish, wingless insects parasitic on birds and mammals, including humans; they are usually one sixteenth to one sixth of an inch (0.15 to 0.4 cm) long. Lice are classified into two orders, Anoplura (the sucking lice) and Mallophaga (the bird lice or biting lice). The causal organisms of typhus, relapsing fever, trench fever, and other diseases are transmitted by the bites of lice. The most important species parasitic on humans are Pediculus humanus capitis, the head louse, which attaches itself to the hairs of the head; P. humanus corporis, the body or clothes louse; and Phthirus pubis, the crab louse, which lives in the pubic hair, eyelashes, and eyebrows. Endemics of head lice infestations occur most frequently in school children. Pubic lice are often sexually transmitted. Louse infestation is called pediculosis.

louse

, pl.

lice

(lows, līs),
Common name for members of the ectoparasitic insect orders Anoplura (sucking lice) and Mallophaga (biting lice). Important species are Felicola subrostrata (cat louse), Goniocotes gallinae (fluff louse), Goniodes dissimilis (brown chicken louse), Haemodipsus ventricosus (rabbit louse), Lipeurus caponis (wing louse), Menacanthus stramineus (chicken body louse), Pthirus pubis (crab or pubic louse), and Polyplax serratus (mouse louse).
[A.S. lūs]

louse

(lous)
n.
pl. lice (līs) Any of numerous small, flat-bodied, wingless biting or sucking insects of the order Phthiraptera, which live as external parasites on birds and mammals, including humans. The lice are sometimes classified together with the psocids in the order Psocodea.
A flat wingless parasitic insect, that may be a carrier of pathogens; its plural is lice

louse

 A flat wingless parasitic insect
Of Lice & Men
Biting lice, Order Mallophaga, which rarely affect humans
Sucking lice, Order Anoplua, family Pediculidae, which are global in distribution, and serve as either
• Disease vectors, eg Borrelia recurrentisBhermisi turcatae, B parkeri or
• Themselves cause disease—Pediculus humanis capitis, head lice, Pediculus humanis corporis, body lice, Phthirus pubis, crabs, pubic lice  

louse

, pl. lice (lows, līs)
Common name for members of the ectoparasitic insect orders Anoplura (sucking lice) and Mallophaga (biting lice).
[A.S. lūs]
Enlarge picture
LOUSE: SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; James Gathany

louse

(lows) Pediculus.

body louse

Pediculus humanus corporis.

clothes louse

See: Pediculus humanus corporis

crab louse

Phthirus inguinalis and Phthirus pubis; the louse that infests the pubic region and other hairy areas of the body. See: pediculosis

head louse

Pediculus humanus capitis. See: illustration

louse

See LICE.

louse

any wingless insect of the order Mallophaga (bird lice or biting lice) or the order Anopleura (sucking lice).
References in periodicals archive ?
Four new species of Brueelia Keler, 1936 (Phthiraptera: Ischnocera: Philopteridae) from African songbirds (Passeriformes: Sturnidae and Laniidae).
Contribucion al conocimiento de los malofagos (Phthiraptera, Amblycera, Ischnocera) de aves peruanas.
The proposition of new associations between lice and host is a controversial subject in the Phthiraptera order, given the particularities they present (Valim et al.
Most genera of the Phthiraptera are restricted to particular taxa and some louse species parasitize only one host species (Clayton et al., 2008).
Phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences of elongation factor I alpha identifies major groups of lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera).
A review of the phoretic relationship between Mallophaga (Phthiraptera: Insecta) and Hippoboscidae (Diptera: Insecta).
minuta essential oil against head lice Pediculus humanus capitis (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae) exhibited lethal time ([LT.sub.50]) of 16.4 [+ or -] 1.62 min denoting toxicity of the essential oil (27).
The blood-sucking lice (Phthiraptera: Anoplura) are permanent, host specific ectoparasites of mammals.
Five species of ectoparasites were collected during this study, including 190 American dog ticks (Dermacentor variabilis Say, Acari: Ixodidae), 64 fleas [63 Pulex simulans Baker, 1 Eulioplopsyllus glacialis affinis (Baker), Siphonaptera, Pulicidae], 12 fur mites, (Didelphilichus serrifer Fain, Acari: Atopomelidae) and one chewing louse [Neotricliodectes mephiditis (Packard), Phthiraptera, Trichodectidae] (Table 1).
Chewing lice (Phthiraptera, Amblycera, Ischnocera) from chukars (Alectoris chukar) from a pheasant farm in Jinacovice (Czech Republic).