phronesis

(redirected from Phronetic)

phronesis

 [fro-ne´sis]
in bioethics, the virtue of practical wisdom, the capacity for moral insight to discern what moral choice or course of action is most conducive to the good of the agent or the activity in which the agent is engaged.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The epistemology revisited in the feminist discourse is reflexive, creative and phronetic toward the sustainable account of the world.
Antonacopoulou (2010) also has argued that it is only through this reflective criticism, of a phronetic orientation, that it is possible to change the results of actions and intentions.
Se observa en este trabajo una maduracion de su pensamiento, y en especial la influencia de Aristoteles, puesta de manifiesto en el desarrollo de su liderazgo prudencial (phronetic leadership).
movement; as well as Hess's phronetic intervention at various sites of rhetorical display.
A Perestroikan straw man answers back: David Laitin and phronetic political science.--Polit.
I then integrate Bourdieu's theory and a phronetic understanding of the cultivation of wise practitioners and practice.
'Questioning the virtues of pro-environmental behaviour research: Towards a phronetic approach'.
I conclude that though nursing is an intensely practical activity, it requires a highly knowledgeable, reflective, virtuous practitioner to be able to care well, and higher education, though ideally placed to nurture those capacities, has yet to convince the nursing profession of the importance of phronetic virtue in nurse education.
This comparative lack of philosophical engagement with Flyvbjerg's project is all the more surprising given that he systematically invokes Aristotle, Foucault and (to an extent) Habermas as the tutelary spirits for his phronetic project.