phronema


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phronema

An obsolete term that related certain areas of the cerebral cortex with conscious thought.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gregory of Nyssa's On the Soul and Resurrection and the Catechetical Oration," Phronema 27 (2012) 125-62, challenges the majority view of Gregory as a universalist.
According to De Temmerman, two features in particular define Charicleia: mental strength (phronema) and chastity (sophrosyne) (246-58).
He has published in a number of academic journals including the Journal of Religious History, Nova Religio, the International Journal for the Study of New Religions, the Alternative Spirituality and Religions Review, Phronema, and the Journal of the Australian Catholic Historical Society.
This liturgy of the faithful within the community requires the illumination of the Holy Spirit, the sharing in the light (Luke 24:4) that flowed from the tomb of the risen Christ and the mindset (in Greek, phronema) of the cross and of the resurrection.
In the 19th century, Cardinal Newman signalled an active role for the laity in discerning the Spirit when he wrote that church leaders must take seriously "a sort of instinct, or phronema, deep in the mystical body of Christ."
In our day people are keen to show how tenaciously they adhere to the Traditional Orthodox View, the Traditional Orthodox Practice, the Traditional Orthodox "Phronema" or "Mind".
Terms for good and bad sense, thinking, counsel, judgment, learning, and decision are liberally mixed with the terminology of piety and justice in the discussion of both Creon's and Antigone's positions: aboulia and euboulia; manthanein and amathia; nous, xunnoia and anoia; phronein, phrenes, phronema and aphrosune; moria; gnome and gignoskein; hamartanein and harmartia; ate; and a variety of cognates and alternatives.
Jurisdiction has replaced Church in our distorted phronema and divided state of existence.
Publications forthcoming are "The Early Christian Reception History of Genesis 18: From Theophany to Trinitarian Symbolism," Journal of Early Christian Studies; and "Clement of Alexandria's Exegesis of Old Testament Theophanies," Phronema. Most recently published is "Exegesis and Intertextuality in Anastasius of Sinai's Homily on the Transfiguration," Studia patristiea 68 (2013).
defining, promulgating and enforcing any portion of that tradition resides solely in the Ecclesia docens." Newman went on to speak of this consensus as "a sort of instinct, or phronema, deep in the bosom of the mystical body of Christ." (96)