transduction

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transduction

 [trans-duk´shun]
the transfer of a genetic fragment from one microorganism to another by bacteriophage.

trans·duc·tion

(tranz-dŭk'shŭn),
1. Transfer of genetic material (and its phenotypic expression) from one cell to another by viral infection.
2. A form of genetic recombination in bacteria.
3. Conversion of energy from one form to another.
[trans- + L. duco, pp. ductus, to lead across]

transduction

/trans·duc·tion/ (-duk´shun)
1. a method of genetic recombination in bacteria, in which DNA is transferred between bacteria via bacteriophages.
2. the transforming of one form of energy into another, as by the sensory mechanisms of the body.

sensory transduction  the process by which a sensory receptor converts a stimulus from the environment to an action potential for transmission to the brain.

transduction

(trăns-dŭk′shən, trănz-)
n.
2. The transfer of genetic material from one cell to another, especially a bacterial cell, through the use of a bacteriophage.

trans·duc′tion·al adj.

transduction

[-duk′shən]
a method of genetic recombination by which DNA is transferred from one cell to another by a viral vector. Various bacteriophages transfer DNA from one species of bacteria to another.

trans·duc·tion

(trans-dŭk'shŭn)
1. Transfer of genetic material (and its phenotypic expression) from one cell to another by viral infection.
2. A form of genetic recombination in bacteria.
3. Conversion of energy from one form to another.
[trans- + L. duco, pp. ductus, to lead across]

transduction

1. The conversion of energy in one form into energy in another.
2. The transfer of a gene from one bacterial host to another by means of a phage.
3. The transfer of a gene from one cell host to another by a retrovirus.

transduction

  1. the transfer of DNA from one bacterium to another, using a VIRUS as a vector. The donor is subjected to LYSIS, the recipient is infected with a transducing phage. See GENERALIZED TRANSDUCTION, SPECIALIZED TRANSDUCTION.
  2. the process of relaying a signal (e.g. a hormone) to an effector system to stimulate the appropriate cellular response.
  3. a process involved in conversion of one form of energy (e.g. light) into another (e.g. chemical).

transduction 

Generally, the conversion of one form of energy into another. Example: the transformation of light energy into receptor potentials in the photoreceptors of the retina (also called phototransduction). The absorption of light by the pigments of the photoreceptors triggers a cascade of biochemical events that leads to a change in ionic fluxes across the plasma membrane and to a change in resting potential from around −40 mV in the dark, to around −70 mV in light, that is a hyperpolarization of the cells. See depolarization; hyperpolarization; receptor potential; visual pigment.

transduction

the transfer of a genetic fragment from one bacterium to another by bacteriophage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Corrigendum to "A model of phototransduction by the human circadian system".
Specifically, PDC modulates visual phototransduction by binding with the [beta]- and [gamma]-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-protein (G[beta][gamma]) transducin (Kuo et al.
Despite the differences, each PRC possesses well-defined subcellular domains concerned with particular functions including phototransduction, aerobic metabolism, gene expression and transmitter release.
A substantial portion of the book is devoted to the rhodopsin-based phototransduction pathway in vertebrate retinal rod cells.
These light-sensitive retinal ganglion cells extend an expansive arbor of dendrites that seems to form a "photoreceptive net" and project to the SCN via the retinohypothalamic tract for circadian phototransduction (Gooley et al.