photosynthesis

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photosynthesis

 [fo″to-sin´thĕ-sis]
a chemical combination caused by the action of light; specifically the formation of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water in the chlorophyll tissue of plants under the influence of light. adj., adj photosynthet´ic.

pho·to·syn·the·sis

(fō'tō-sin'thĕ-sis),
1. The compounding or building up of chemical substances under the influence of light.
2. The process by which green plants, using chlorophyll and the energy of sunlight, produce carbohydrates from water and carbon dioxide, liberating molecular oxygen in the process.
[photo- + G. synthesis, a putting together]

photosynthesis

/pho·to·syn·the·sis/ (fo″to-sin´thĭ-sis) a chemical combination caused by the action of light; specifically, the formation of carbohydrates from carbon dioxoide and water in the chlorophyll tissue of plants under the influence of light.photosynthet´ic

photosynthesis

(fō′tō-sĭn′thĭ-sĭs)
n.
The process in green plants and certain other organisms by which carbohydrates are synthesized from carbon dioxide and a source of hydrogen (usually water), using light as an energy source. Most forms of photosynthesis release oxygen as a byproduct.

pho′to·syn·thet′ic (-sĭn-thĕt′ĭk) adj.
pho′to·syn·thet′i·cal·ly adv.

photosynthesis

[fōtōsin′thəsis]
Etymology: Gk, phos + synthesis, putting together
a process by which plants, algae, and some bacteria containing chlorophyll synthesize organic compounds, chiefly carbohydrates, from atmospheric carbon dioxide and water, using light for energy and liberating oxygen in the process. photosynthetic, adj.

pho·to·syn·the·sis

(fō'tō-sin'thĕ-sis)
1. The compounding or building up of chemical substances under the influence of light.
2. The process by which green plants, using chlorophyll and the energy of sunlight, produce carbohydrates from water and carbon dioxide, liberating molecular oxygen in the process.
[photo- + G. synthesis, a putting together]

photosynthesis

the process by which plants convert carbon dioxide and water into organic chemicals using the energy of light, with the release of oxygen. Photosynthesis occurs in green plants which are known as AUTOTROPHS. CYANOBACTERIA also carry out photosynthesis. See LIGHT REACTIONS and CALVIN CYCLE.

photosynthesis (fōˈ·tō·sinˑ·th·sis),

n metabolic process by which plants and some bacteria use carbon dioxide and sunlight to produce glucose. Oxygen is a by product of this process.

photosynthesis

a chemical combination caused by the action of light; specifically the formation of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water in the chlorophyll tissue of plants under the influence of light.
References in periodicals archive ?
Compare and contrast photosynthesis and respiration.
G] in the hollows showed a strong dependence of both photosynthesis and respiration on the water table (see Table 2).
These studies pointed out the importance of the balance between photosynthesis and respiration during high temperature stress.
Photosynthesis and respiration of Pinus pumila needles in relation to needle age and season.
Results suggest that a decline in root activity of creeping bentgrass occurred before a decline in turf quality at temperatures above 30[degrees]C, and could be related to the imbalance between photosynthesis and respiration, and limited carbohydrate availability.
Pioneer trees, for example, are typically characterized by light-induced seed germination, high growth and mortality rates, short leaf life spans, high tissue nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations, low wood density, early reproductive maturation, and high fecundity, as well as high rates and plasticities of photosynthesis and respiration (Swaine and Whitmore 1988, Raaimakers et al.
Actual photosynthesis and respiration were estimated for observed values of PPFD and temperature by the following equation:
2] exchange into components due to photosynthesis and respiration.
Gross photosynthesis was estimated by adding net photosynthesis and respiration during the 16-h light period.