photopsin

(redirected from Photosensitive pigment)

pho·top·sin

(fō-top'sin),
The protein moiety (opsin) of the pigment (iodopsin) in the cones of the retina.

photopsin

/pho·top·sin/ (fo-top´sin) the protein moiety of the cones of the retina that combines with retinal to form photochemical pigments.

pho·top·sin

(fō-top'sin)
The protein moiety (opsin) of the pigment (iodopsin) in the cones of the retina.

photopsin

(fō-tŏp′sĭn)
The protein portion (opsin) of the photopigments in the cones of the retina.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Although the cells of the retina themselves don't renew, the light sensitive parts do," explained Professor Marshall, pointing to the turnover of discs of photosensitive pigment.
The most famous photosensitive pigment in plants, of course, is chlorophyll.
If we understand how photosensitive pigments respond to specific wavelengths of light, we will better understand how to improve or change the light quality and thus affect growth and flowering.
These structures are packed to the extreme with photosensitive pigments to capture as many photons as possible in the animals' light-starved environment.