photophore

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pho·to·phore

(fō'tō-fōr),
In bacteriology, the organ producing intracellular bioluminescence in certain organisms.
[photo- + G. phoros, bearing]

photophore

a light-emitting organ. These occur particularly in deep-sea cephalopods and crustaceans and are normally directed vertically, so disguising the animal's outline from below.
References in periodicals archive ?
nov., is distinguished from its congener by a putative pit organ located ventrally just posterior of the lower jaw margin center, photophores irregularly distributed along many areas of the body, 16 distinct ventral-abdominal photophore aggregations, and two differences associated with the dentition," the researchers described the new shark species in (https://biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4619.1.4) Zootaxa.
"There is this fish that has a photophore underneath its eye that it uses as a flashlight to look for prey," he said.
Other lanternsharks have photophores all over their bellies, but the new shark has fewer, and most are concentrated on its head, Vasquez said.
Claes said that there are two spines, one in front of each dorsal fin, and just behind them they have two rows of photophores, which are like lightsabers - they illuminate the spine.
Hyaloteuthis, Eucleoteuthis and Ommastrephes are relatively rare in the ETP (all the molecularly identified ommastrephids in this study were Sthenoteuthis or Dosidicus; see also Yatsu (3)), and only 9 specimens were tentatively identified as Eucleoteuthis and 2 specimens were tentatively identified as Ommastrephes by proboscis suckers and photophores (6 others were excluded from Dosidicus or Sthenoteuthis but were too small to be assignable to the other 3 genera).
Various forms, particularly those affecting hydrodynamic flow, may be associated with sensory organs--for example, pit organs and photophores (Reif, 1978; Gomahr et al., 1992).
But their habit bf hiding in the darkness by day and chasing darkness upward at night led to the development of extraordinarily large eyes and organs, known as photophores, capable of producing light-usually a weak blue, green, or yellowish light-the color and pattern of which signal the fish's species and gender, as well as information used in shoaling and other communications we don't understand.
Tentacles, sparkling photophores, bacteria-powered lures that protrude from the forehead and mimic a yummy morsel: they light up when the creature needs to hunt or hide or mate.
The chemical reaction takes place in organs called photophores near the hatchetfish's belly.
They possess numerous photophores on the ventral surface, said to confuse predators that hunt them from below against the scarce light that penetrates from the surface of the sea.