phosphorus

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phosphorus

 (P) [fos´for-us]
a chemical element, atomic number 15, atomic weight 30.974. (See Appendix 6.) Phosphorus is an essential element in the diet; in the form of phosphates it is a major component of the mineral phase of bone and is involved in almost all metabolic processes. It also plays an important role in cell metabolism. It is obtained by the body from milk products, cereals, meat, and fish, and its use by the body is controlled by vitamin D and calcium.

Free phosphorus is very inflammable and exceedingly poisonous; ingestion causes fatty degeneration of the liver and other viscera. Inhalation of its vapor by workers in chemical industries may cause necrosis of the mandible (phosphonecrosis). adj., adj phosphor´ous.
phosphorus 32 a radioisotope of phosphorus having a half-life of 14.28 days and emitting only beta particles, used as a radiopharmaceutical. As the sodium salt its therapeutic uses include treatment of polycythemia vera, chronic granulocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and palliation of metastatic skeletal disease. As a colloid with chromium its uses include treatment of certain ovarian and prostate carcinomas and of intraperitoneal and intrapleural malignant effusions resulting from metatstatic disease. Symbol 32P.

phos·pho·rus (P),

(fos'fō-rŭs), Do not confuse this word with phosphorous.
A nonmetallic chemical element, atomic no. 15, atomic wt. 30.973762, occurring extensively in nature, always in compounds such as phosphates and phosphites and as the phosphate in every living cell; the elemental form is extremely poisonous, causing intense inflammation and fatty degeneration; repeated inhalation of phosphorus fumes may cause necrosis of the jaw (phosphonecrosis); the approximate fatal dose is 50-100 mg.
[G. phosphoros, fr. phōs, light, + phoros, bearing]

phosphorus

/phos·pho·rus/ (P) (fos´fah-rus) chemical element, at. no. 15. Ingestion or inhalation produces toothache, phosphonecrosis (phossy jaw), anorexia, weakness, and anemia. Phosphorus is an essential element in the diet; in the form of phosphates, it is a major component of the mineral phase of bone and occurs in all tissues, being involved in almost all metabolic processes.phos´phorousphosphor´ic
phosphorus 32  a radioisotope of phosphorus having a half-life of 14.28 days and emitting beta particles (1.71 MeV); therapeutic uses include treatment of polycythemia vera, chronic myelocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and certain ovarian and prostate carcinomas, palliation of metastatic skeletal disease, and treatment of intraperitoneal and intrapleural malignant effusions.

phosphorus (P)

[fos′fərəs]
Etymology: Gk, phos, light, pherein, to bear
a nonmetallic chemical element occurring extensively in nature as a component of phosphate rock. Its atomic number is 15; its atomic mass is 30.975. Phosphorus forms a series of sulfides used commercially in the manufacture of matches. It can be prepared in yellow or white, red, and black allotropic forms. Phosphorus is essential for the metabolism of protein, calcium, and glucose. The body uses phosphorus in its combined forms, which are obtained from such nutritional sources as milk, cheese, meat, egg yolk, whole grains, legumes, and nuts. A nutritional deficiency of phosphorus can cause weight loss, anemia, and abnormal growth. Phosphorus is essential to the body for the production of adenosine triphosphate and for the process of glycolysis. Elemental white or yellow phosphorus is extremely poisonous and produces severe GI irritation. If ingested, it can produce hemorrhage, cardiovascular failure, and death. Chronic poisoning by phosphorus is characterized by anemia, cachexia, bronchitis, and necrosis of the mandible. Normal adult blood levels of phosphorus are 3 to 4.5 mg/dL or 0.97 to 1.45 mmol/L (SI units).

phosphorus

A nonmetallic element (atomic number 15, atomic weight 30.97) which is a principal intracellular anion. Phosphorus plays key roles in biochemical synthesis, storage and use of energy in cells through the formation of high-energy phosphate bonds; it is intimately linked to the regulation of calcium levels, carbohydrate, lipid and acid-base metabolism. Phosphorus is essential to bone and tooth formation; 85% of the body’s phosphorus and phosphates are stored in bone.

Dietary source
Dairy, fish, legumes, meats, nuts, poultry, whole grains.

Phosphorus

Homeopathy
A homeopathic remedy formulated from phosphorus used for anaemia, circulatory defects, fatigue, gastrointestinal (nausea due to food poisoning) and respiratory (asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia) tract complaints, burning chest pains, gastritis, haemorrhage, insomnia, menstrual dysfunction, nasal polyps, nosebleeds and tension.

phos·pho·rus

(fos'fŏr-ŭs)
A nonmetallic chemical element, atomic no. 15, atomic wt. 30.973762, occurring extensively in nature, always in chemical combination; the elemental form is extremely poisonous, causing intense inflammation and fatty degeneration; repeated inhalation of phosphorus fumes may cause necrosis of the jaw (phosphonecrosis).
[G. phosphoros, fr. phōs, light, + phoros, bearing]

phos·pho·rus

(fos'fŏr-ŭs)
A nonmetallic chemical element, occurring extensively in nature; the elemental form is extremely poisonous, causing intense inflammation and fatty degeneration; repeated inhalation of phosphorus fumes may cause necrosis of the jaw (phosphonecrosis).
[G. phosphoros, fr. phōs, light, + phoros, bearing]

phosphorus (P) (fos´fərus),

n a nonmetallic element; atomic weight, 30.98. It is essential, as is the phosphate, for the mineralization of the organic matrix of teeth and bone. It is also essential in the intermediary metabolism of carbohydrates as a vital constituent of the various intermediary compounds (e.g., glucose 6-phosphate) and of the enzyme systems (e.g., adenosine triphosphate [ATP]).

phosphorus

a chemical element, atomic number 15, atomic weight 30.974, symbol P. See Table 6. Phosphorus is an essential element in the diet. In the form of phosphates it is a major component of the mineral phase of bone and is involved in almost all metabolic processes. It also plays an important role in cell metabolism. It is obtained by the body from milk products, cereals, meat and fish, and its use by the body is controlled by vitamin D and calcium.

phosphorus-32
a radioisotope of phosphorus having a half-life of 14.3 days and emitting only beta rays; used in the form of sodium phosphate P-32 for treatment of polycythemia vera, chronic myelocytic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and in localizing certain tumors during surgery. Symbol 32P.
calcium:phosphorus ratio
see calcium: phosphorus ratio.
inorganic phosphorus
any phosphorus-containing compound which does not also contain carbon.
phosphorus nutritional deficiency
causes rickets in the young and osteomalacia in adult ruminants. In less severe deficiency states there is pica, growth retardation, infertility and possibly retention of placenta. See also postparturient hemoglobinuria. An unlikely nutritional deficiency in carnivores.
phosphorus poisoning
is very rare because of the absence of elemental phosphorus from the environment. Causes severe gastroenteritis with vomiting and diarrhea. If the animal survives the gastroenteritis there is a subsequent acute hepatic insufficiency.
phosphorus restriction
indicated in the dietary management of chronic renal disease and secondary hyperaparathyroidism; in dogs and cats, usually accomplished by reducing the content of meat.
phosphorus supplements
supplementing the diets of animals exposed to phosphorus deficient feeds is usually achieved by feeding bone meal, or calcium or sodium phosphates. All are readily assimilable but none are palatable and special devices are often necessary to get animals to take required amounts. See also dietary phosphate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tarafder JC, Classen N (1988) Organic phosphorus compounds as a phosphorus source for higher plants through the activity of phosphatases produced by plant roots and microorganisms.
Above average gains will also be registered by antimony oxide (a synergist usually used in concert with brominated compounds), magnesium hydroxide and phosphorus compounds.
Compared to other phosphorus compounds, they have number advantages such as nontoxicity, and hydrolytic stability in the presence of water [13-18].
Doolette AL, Smernik RJ, Dougherty WJ (2009) Spiking improved solution phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance identification of soil phosphorus compounds.
Topics include elements of flotation rate constant prediction and coarse apatite flotation, mechanisms involved in reactive flotation of dolomite, sustainable mining, plasma verification of sewage sludge containing phosphorus compounds, reclaiming uranium from phosphoric acid, Hidroveg chemicals in American phosphate rock flotation, effects of particle size, pure fatty acids in phosphate floatation, dense medium separation, novel bio-organisms, carbonate separation, in-situ mining, laser-induced breakdown spectrometry, on-stream slurry particle sizers, automatic control systems, and studies from Florida and China.
Based on proprietary phosphorus compounds, the masterbatches achieve their flame-retardant property through intumescence.
Much of the problem was attributed to increased algal growth triggered by atmospheric deposition of phosphorus compounds associated in part with road dust.
Burton JD (1973) Problems in the analysis of phosphorus compounds.
The major use of phosphorus compounds is in fertilizers, especially in a mixture called superphosphate, obtained from phosphate minerals by sulfuric acid treatment, and in nitrophosphates.
A polysulfone modified with different phosphorus compounds could be blended with a bisphenol A-based epoxy resin to obtain a material with improved toughness and glass transition temperature as well as a flame retardancy of the thermosetting resin (10-11) Wu et al.
However, the DRP test has been shown to overestimate orthophosphate concentrations due to the hydrolysis of acid-labile phosphorus compounds (Burton 1973; Broberg and Pettersson 1988).
Freedonia predicts that gains will be concentrated in brominated and phosphorus compounds and in more specialized antimony oxide and magnesium hydroxide formulations.