phosphor

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phos·phor

(fos'fŏr),
1. A chemical substance that transforms incident electromagnetic or radiation energy into light, as in scintillation radioactivity determinations or radiographic intensifying screens or image amplifiers.
2. Any substance capable of exhibiting phosphorescence.
[G. phōs, light, + phoros, bearing]

phos·phor

(fos'fŏr)
A chemical substance that transforms incident electromagnetic or radioactive energy into light, as in scintillation radioactivity determinations or radiographic intensifying screens or image amplifiers.
[G. phōs, light, + phoros, bearing]

phosphor

(fos′fŏr, ′for″) [Fr. phosphore, fr L. phosphorus, morning star, fr Gr. phōsphoros, light-bringer]
A substance that in radiographic intensifying screens, fluoroscopic image intensifiers, or other image receptors converts photons of ionizing radiation into light, thereby amplifying the image.

rare-earth phosphor

An element such as yttrium, gadolinium, or lanthanum, used for ultra-high-speed radiographic intensification screens.
References in periodicals archive ?
Blue LED Source Spectrum, Excitation, and Emission Spectra of the Phosphors. Figure 2 shows the excitation and emission spectra of the R-645, R-626, G-531, and G-529 phosphors and the spectra of the pumping source for the experimental results.
It is a new technology and is the emission of light from a phosphor material layer when an electric current is passed through it [7-11].
A team of scientists have found replacements for these scare elements: a green phosphor that reduces the terbium content by 90% and eliminates lanthanum and a red phosphor that completely replaces europium and yttrium oxide.
Remote phosphors can be used in many different ways for a majority of lighting applications.
SEM Images of Synthesized Phosphors. Figure 3 shows the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images of powders prepared at 800[degrees]C.
The samples obtained in the experiment were marked as A-x, respectively, for the pressure impregnation procedure, where 'V indicates a phosphor [([Ca.sub.1.5][Mg.sub.0.5]Sr) [O.sub.3] * [Al.sub.2][O.sub.3] * Si[O.sub.2]0.05B-0.01EuO * 0.005[Nd.sub.2][O.sub.3]] solution concentration of 0, 10, 20, 40, and 60wt%, respectively.
With the commonly used strontium aluminate phosphors, the data from previous and present experimental work indicated that the last [[alpha].sub.i], rather than the last [[tau].sub.i], in an exponential equation is most strongly correlated with the afterglow characteristics of an object.
Yamamoto, "White LED phosphors: the next step," in Optical Components and Materials VII, Proceedings of SPIE, 2010.
The longer a phosphor stands after the excitation, the more trapped carriers will leave the traps, and the subsequently measured luminescence peaks will be weaker.
A high luminous flux of white light was realized through the development of a phosphor material that is not subject to luminance saturation[2] even when irradiated with high-intensity laser light.
Spectroscopic studies of these phosphors play a vital role in characterizing the specific luminescence properties such as photoluminescence and thermoluminescence.