lipid bilayer

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lipid bilayer

The two layers of phospholipid molecules included within the outer membrane of most cells. These layers are arranged so their two hydrophilic (water-soluble) sides face the interior and the exterior of the cell, and their hydrophobic (nonpolar) core is in between. The membrane is relatively impermeable to molecules such as glucose and amino acids but very permeable to lipid-soluble molecules such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, and alcohol.
See: cell for illus
See also: bilayer
References in periodicals archive ?
Conti Nibali et al., "Interaction of alcohol with phospholipid membrane: NMR and XRD investigations on DPPC-hexanol system," Spectroscopy, vol.
Cremer, "Investigations of bivalent antibody binding on fluid-supported phospholipid membranes: The effect of hapten density," Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol.
Crupi et al., "Influence of alcohols on the lateral diffusion in phospholipid membranes," Journal of Physical Chemistry B, vol.
"The influence of fat component of food ration on ion penetration of bilayer phospholipid membranes," Nutrition problems [Voprosi pitaniya], in Russian, No.4, pp.13-17.
This typical brain lipid architecture, with its bulky fatty acids, provides the phospholipid membranes with a high degree of elasticity.
For example, much of the information on cell signalling is extrapolated from artificially generated phospholipid membranes loaded with the proteins and chemical signals that are believed to comprise the signaling system.
Molecular and structural composition of phospholipid membranes in livers of marine and freshwater fish in relation to temperature.
During the last few years, a flurry of research has centered on DHA found in human milk, as well as in the phospholipid membranes of the retina and brain.
Indeed, reactive oxygen species and the free radicals they induce are known to attack polyunsaturated fatty acids in phospholipid membranes, thereby initiating lipid peroxidation reactions, which alter membrane characteristics and induce cell damage.
Being fat-soluble, vitamin D as calcitriol easily crosses the phospholipid membranes of your cells and migrates to the nucleus.
Conversely, if the system affected by pressure challenge is lipid-based, then a decrease in pressure (which decreases the viscosity of phospholipid membranes) would be compensated by a temperature reduction (causing an increase in membrane viscosity), whereas increased pressure would be counteracted by a temperature increase.
The failure of crabs subjected to a pressure of 62 MPa at 5 [degrees] C to recover fully from treatment suggests that disruption of the phospholipid membranes at this pressure-temperature combination is so complete as to be irreversible.