phosphene

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phosphene

 [fos´fēn]
an objective visual sensation that occurs with the eyes closed, and in the absence of retinal stimulation by visible light.

phos·phene

(fos'fēn),
Sensation of light produced by mechanical or electrical stimulation of the peripheral or central optic pathway of the nervous system.
[G. phōs, light, + phainō, to show]

phosphene

(fŏs′fēn′)
n.
A sensation of light caused by excitation of the retina by mechanical or electrical means rather than by light, as when the eyeballs are pressed through closed lids.

phos·phene

(fos'fēn)
Sensation of light produced by mechanical or electrical stimulation of the peripheral or central optic pathway of the nervous system.
[G. phōs, light, + phainō, to show]

phosphene 

A visual sensation arising from stimulation of the retina by something other than light. The stimulation can be either electrical, mechanical (e.g. a blow to the head or pressure on the eyeball), or some electromagnetic waves such as X-rays. See entoptic image; photopsia; adequate stimulus.
References in periodicals archive ?
The images processed by the phosphene model correspond to the actual electrode array of visual prosthesis.
Current generations of retinal prostheses return a very basic vision consisting of phosphene percepts [18-21].
The occurrence of cortical phosphenes proposed by Kanai et al.
In case of two reports, it was not clear whether the images were seen with open or closed eyes (aurora-like phosphenes, geometric shapes, fractals).
Un intentionnaliste pourrait retorquer que dans la perception il y a bien une marge d'erreur representee par la vaste gamme d'illusions et d'hallucinations perceptives : batons casses dans l'eau, pieces apparemment elliptiques, tours carrees qui "deviennent" rondes, phosphenes, mirages ...
A history of hypertension, diabetes, or polymyalgia rheumatica points to vascular causes, and hyperthyroidism suggests that flashing lights may be phosphenes of Graves' disease.
Such experiences of seeing light when light is not actually entering the eye are known as phosphenes. (The pattern of light you see when you rub your closed eyes is a type of phosphene.)
One possibility is that rubbing or pressing the eye may stimulate the optic nerve endings and evoke so-called phosphenes, sensations of light at the cortical level (Fazzi et al., 1999).
It is very common for a people to see such patterns (described as 'phosphenes' by psychologists) when they first go into trance or when under the influence of hallucinatory drugs (not the case with Cassell).
With effort Charlie sat up, and the simple movement sent whorls of twinkling phosphenes caroling before his eyes.
On the other hand, this reviewer has noted a number of lapses: Sagona's rather wild speculations concerning shamanism, "phosphenes," and the neuropsychological underpinnings of Palaeolithic art (pp.