phosphatase

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phosphatase

 [fos´fah-tās]
any of a group of enzymes capable of catalyzing the hydrolysis of esterified phosphoric acid, with liberation of inorganic phosphate, found in practically all tissues, body fluids, and cells, including erythrocytes and leukocytes.
acid phosphatase see acid phosphatase.
alkaline phosphatase see alkaline phosphatase.

phos·pha·tase

(fos'fă-tās),
Any of a group of enzymes (EC 3.1.3.x) that liberate orthophosphate from phosphoric esters.
See also: phosphohydrolases.

phosphatase

/phos·pha·tase/ (-tās) any of a group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of inorganic phosphate from esters.

phosphatase

(fŏs′fə-tās′, -tāz′)
n.
Any of numerous enzymes that catalyze the removal of phosphate groups by hydrolysis of phosphate ester bonds. They act in the opposite manner to kinases and are important in metabolism and cell signaling.

phosphatase

[fos′fətāz]
an enzyme that acts as a catalyst in chemical reactions involving phosphorus. It is present in serum, semen, the kidney, and the prostate. It is essential in the calcification of bone. See also catalyst, enzyme.

phos·pha·tase

(fos'fă-tās)
Any of a group of enzymes (EC sub-subclass 3.1.3) that liberate inorganic phosphate from phosphoric esters.

phosphatase

An enzyme that removes phosphate groups from a molecule.

phosphatase

an enzyme that catalyses the release of phosphate from a molecule. For example, in the mammalian liver phosphorylated glucose can be broken down to glucose with a phosphatase enzyme. see GLYCOGEN.

phos·pha·tase

(fos'fă-tās)
Any of a group of enzymes (EC sub-subclass 3.1.3) that liberate inorganic phosphate from phosphoric esters.

phosphatase(s) (fos´fətās),

n a group of enzymes that are distributed throughout most cells and body fluids and are characterized by their ability to hydrolyze a wide variety of monophosphate esters to alcohols and inorganic phosphate.
phosphatase, acid,
n a group of phosphatases (e.g., serum, liver, prostate) with optimal activity below a pH level of 7. Elevated serum levels have been observed in metastatic breast and prostatic cancer; Paget's, Gaucher's, and Niemann-Pick diseases and in myelocytic leukemia.
phosphatase, alkaline,
n a group of phosphatases (e.g., serum, liver, bone) whose optimal activity ranges near a pH level of 9.8. Elevated blood levels occur in Paget's disease and pregnancy, whereas low levels are characteristic of dwarfism and a generalized nutritional protein deficiency.

phosphatase

any of a group of enzymes capable of catalyzing the hydrolysis of esterified phosphoric acid, with liberation of inorganic phosphate, found in practically all tissues, body fluids and cells, including erythrocytes and leukocytes.

acid phosphatase
a lysosomal enzyme that hydrolyzes phosphate esters liberating phosphate, showing optimal activity at a pH between 3 and 6; found in erythrocytes, prostatic tissue, spleen, kidney and other tissues.
alkaline phosphatase
an isoenzyme showing optimal activity at a pH of about 10; found in bone, liver, kidney, leukocytes, adrenal cortex and other tissues, often used in clinical diagnosis of liver and/or bone damage. Called also AP; see also alkaline phosphatase.
phosphatase inhibitor-1
inhibitor of phosphatase enzymes known to activate glycogen synthesis or inactivate glycogen breakdown. Need to themselves be phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent kinases before they are effective in their inhibitory activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our experiments suggest that root phosphatases are a contributing factor.
Refrigerated serum specimens were used as the source of alkaline phosphatase.
Microcystin-LR is a strong inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 and 2A and eventually causes hyperphosphorylation of cytosolic and cytoskeletal proteins (14).
Serum band 5 tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TrACP; EC 3.
Determine the advantage of phosphatases for developing human therapeutics over other known classes of drug targets through a comprehensive breakdown of their classifications, mechanisms, and limitations.
Analysis of heat inactivation curves of alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes in serum.
In patients with chronic hepatic failure (and no evidence of metabolic bone disease) a BAP enzyme immunoassay ("Alkphase-B") was the only alkaline phosphatase assay showing a lack of significant increase in BAP in women over the values seen in the male reference subjects (indicating no clinically relevant cross-reactivity of the assay) [1].
With numerous discovery and clinical programs underway for a variety of therapeutic classes, phosphatases could potentially provide new treatments for human disease in the future.
SAN DIEGO -- "Protein Kinases & Phosphatases in Drug Discovery & Development," a conference and exposition in which over 150 international research scientists from big pharma and biotech will convene, will take place in San Diego, CA on March 4-5, 2002, announces Strategic Research Institute.
Pierce and Amphioxus will co-market products used in the sequential process of target identification and validation specific to Kinases, Phosphatases and ADME-TOX.
Two of MAXIA's new classes of compounds target phosphatases: MX7091 inhibits the phosphatase MKP-1 leading to JUNK activation and apoptosis in vitro and tumor regression in vivo.
6,552,169, is titled "DENSITY ENHANCED PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASES.